2015 Georgetown School of Medicine Commencement

2015 Georgetown School of Medicine Commencement


(singing Star Spangled Banner) (crowd applauding) – Please be seated. Good morning. It’s my pleasure to present to you Howard J. Federoff, MD/PhD, the executive vice
president of health sciences and the executive dean of
the school of medicine. Dr. Federoff. (crowd applauding) – Honored guests,
graduating seniors, parents, spouses and friends,
welcome to the graduation of Georgetown University and the 163rd commencement
of the School of Medicine. Thank you to our color guard, all of whom are medical students representing
Army, Navy and Air Force. Sarah Fogelman, Rita
Snyder and Sarah Davis. A special thanks to
the following graduates in the senior choir for
singing the national anthem, Sheila Putsayis, Stephanie Van. Dr. Princy Kumar, MD,
professor of medicine and microbiology and chief of the division of infectious disease
and senior associate dean for students has been
selected by the students to give the invocation. Please rise. Dr. Kumar. (crowd applauding) – God of all blessings, shine your light and send your spirit upon us as we gather to celebrate the graduation of these daughters and sons of Georgetown. Bless these talented women and men whose intellectual curiosity
and desire to serve the sick brought them here to
us just four years ago. They came to explore
with reverence and wonder the depths of your good creation and to become healers of those in need. As you have blessed them
with abundant knowledge bestow upon them now your guiding wisdom so that their knowledge and their skills will bring healing and comfort
to all whom they touch. Bless their parents and
teachers who have guided them and all those who have labored to instruct and challenge
them along the way. Bless the sick and needy
whose lives will be touched and whose burdens will be lightened by the knowledge and compassion of these dedicated young physicians. May they always feel your
presence in their lives. Especially when their work days are long and their nights are filled with doubt as to whether they have
given their very best. We ask all of these things
in your most holy name, Amen. – Please be seated. Although the university’s
founding date is 1789, it was 200 years ago on March 1st, 1815 that the president of the
United States, James Madison approved the federal charter
for the college of Georgetown within the District of Columbia. Introduced into Congress by our first student, William Gaston this spring on March 1st, 2015 the president of the United
States, Barack Obama, sent greetings to Georgetown on the occasion of the
bicentennial of that charter. Among other things he said, and I quote: Simply put, this country and the world benefit from your commitment
to Jesuit principles, to being men and women for others. It is our venerable custom
to begin academic ceremonies with a reading of the charter. To discharge that office I
have the honor to present Mr. Edwin M. Quinn,
secretary of the university. Mr. Quinn. (crowd applauding) – An act concerning the
college of Georgetown in the District of Columbia. Be it enacted by the Senate
and House of Representatives of the United States of
America in Congress assembled, that it shall and may be
lawful for such persons as now are, or from time to time may be, the President and Directors
of the College of Georgetown, within the District of Columbia, to admit any of the students
belonging to said College, or other persons meriting
academical honors, to any degree in the faculties, arts, sciences and liberal professions, to which persons are usually admitted in other colleges and
universities of the United States and to issue in an appropriate form the diplomas or certificates
which may be requisite to testify to the
admission to such degree. Signed Langdon Cheves, Speaker of the House of Representatives John Gaillard, President
pro tempore of the Senate Approved March 1, 1815, James Madison – I would like to call to center stage our honorary degree recipient Richard Gilfillan, MD/MBA, president and chief executive
officer of Trinity Health. (crowd applauding) Today Georgetown University recognizes Dr. Richard J. Gilfillan,
a preeminent leader in healthcare policy development and who has contributed
many innovative solutions for improving the nation’s
healthcare system. He successfully navigated
through the turbulent era of healthcare reform and
provided exemplary leadership to the three key perspectives of government, payer and provider. Gilfillan earned his medical and his undergraduate degrees
at Georgetown University and started his career
as a family physician at the Georgetown University
Community Health Plan. He later moved to Massachusetts where he helped to found
a community health center and a family medicine practice. His first position in
the insurance industry was as medical director for
Medigroup Central, an HMO, a Blue Cross of New
Jersey managed care plan. He served as senior vice president for National Network Management
at Coventry Healthcare and also held positions at
Independence Blue Cross. Gilfillan later became the
chief operating officer of Geisinger Health Plan
and executive vice president of insurance operations for
the Geisinger Health System. The mission and values
of Georgetown University shaped his perspective and
have guided his career. Gilfillan was thinking
about value based models when he was in medical school
at Georgetown University in the 1970s, examining
HMOs and the tripartite goal of better patient experiences, improved population
health and reduced costs. I quote, Dr. Gilfillan said, I went into healthcare because
I was always interested in figuring out how to get
great healthcare to people. He was tapped by then administrator of the Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid Services, the CMS, Don Berwick, MD to help chart a successful path for
the Affordable Care Act. Gilfillan, true to his
Catholic and Jesuit education, put patients at the center
of all deliberations. As the CMS Innovation
Centers first leader, Gilfillan was instrumental
in establishing new payment and delivery models such as
Medicare Accountable Care organizations and bundle payments. He set the tone for new
programs that coordinate care for enrolled populations
seeking to reduce costs while improving patient
outcomes in satisfaction. He was driven by a vision
he calls true north, an alignment of all parts and players in the healthcare system
away from rewarding volume towards rewarding value. This is in order to produce
affordable quality care. After three years as leader
of the Innovations Center, Gilfillan shifted to the provider side, taking the chief executive
position in October 2014 at the newly merged CHE/Trinity Health. The merger brought together
more than 80 hospitals from the former Catholic Health East and the former Trinity Health. In recognition of his
distinguished career in healthcare and his service to society
and for his leadership and innovative efforts
on behalf of patients, Georgetown University awards
Richard J. Gilfillan, MD, the Doctor of Science Honoris Causa. (crowd applauding) President DeGioia will now officially confer the honorary degree. – By virtue of the authority vested in me by the Congress of the United States and by the board of directors
of Georgetown University, I hereby confer the degree
of Doctor of Science Honoris Causa on Richard J. Gilfillan. Ladies and gentlemen it’s now my pleasure to present to you Dr. Richard Gilfillan who will deliver the commencement address. (crowd applauding) – Thank you so much, Dr.
Federoff, for that introduction. Dr. DeGioia, Dr. Mitchell,
for the opportunity to be with you all today. It’s really quite an honor, not one I ever expected to receive. Thank you all for that warm welcome. It’s great to be back at Georgetown and I’m honored and humbled
to be part of this ceremony. Parents, grandparents, family, friends, deans and faculty thank
you all for supporting these young women and men
on their long journey. You helped them get here
and now they’ve become your gifts to the world. Let’s all give these very
important people a great hand. (crowd applauding) As the parent of four wonderful children who went to college and graduated, I know how special a day
this is for you parents. So enjoy it and
congratulations and thank you for a job well done. So in the spirit of a Jesuit university, I feel compelled to
confess something today. So I’m gonna admit that
yes, I was part of a crew that painted the John Carroll statue as Santa Claus for Christmas, 1967. It was beautiful, we
used water based paint. But it was short lived. The police rapidly
dispersed us, chased us. I served my penance that night sleeping next to the dumpster behind Wisemiller’s. I’ll take that for forgiveness, thank you. But I’m proud to be here today as part of American Catholic Healthcare. It’s a ministry started by small groups of religious women and men
more than 160 years ago. Many came from Europe in small numbers. They had minimal resources
and no healthcare training. They became nurses,
teachers and administrators. Some rode horses to remote
mining camps out west. Others served on Civil War hospital ships. These founders were
called to care for people however, wherever, and
whenever they needed it. Catholic Healthcare, Georgetown included, now provides 16% of all
hospital care in America. Today I’d like to talk with
you about how we can continue this remarkable legacy
of bringing healthcare to as many people as possible. Before I do, let me express
my thanks for the excellent undergraduate and medical school education I received here at Georgetown. But my greatest debt of
gratitude to Georgetown is because they had the wisdom
to accept Carmen Caneda, my wife, friend and partner of 47 years into the class of 1971. I’m certain that were it
not for meeting Carmen at Georgetown, I would not
be standing here today. Acceptance into medical school was for me, and probably will be for you, one of the most fortunate
occurrences of your life, aside from meeting your life partner. As a family physician, I experienced the deep personal satisfaction derived from serving thousands of individuals and families when they needed it most, along with the sadness at times, when all I could do wasn’t enough. Or for some reason, I didn’t rise up and give a patient my best. Every job I’ve had provided opportunities to positively impact people’s lives, for one patient at a time in practice and sometimes for millions
in doing policy work. Each was deeply rewarding in its own way. And in all, I was guided by the commitment to always do the right thing for patients that I learned that here at Georgetown. From my experience, I’d say
you’ve made a very wise choice. It is a real privilege and
honor to become a physician and I was very fortunate to
be admitted to medical school. All of us, of course, worked
very hard to reach this point. And while I know you come
from many varied backgrounds I suspect that most of you have also been fortunate in important ways. After all we’re all products
of the gifts we’re born with, the efforts we make along the way and the good fortune we experience. There are others, of course,
who work equally hard but are not so fortunate. That’s why a social safety net is a critical part of a just society and I learned that at Georgetown. As our last four generations of Americans worked hard to build the most advanced economy in the world they also systematically
extended our safety net. My parents’ generation
gave us Social Security. Our parents created Medicare and Medicaid to ensure that the seniors and the poor had access to healthcare. But these improvements still left many Americans without coverage. In 1994, we baby boomers took our shot at universal health coverage and we did not get it done. By 2008, 48 million
Americans were uninsured, twice as many as in the ’70s. That year, led by our
children’s generation and including you millennials
in record numbers, we did get it done. We elected a president
and a Congress that, through the Affordable Care
Act, created the potential to close this gap in our safety net. But that was only the
beginning of ensuring that all Americans have
access to great healthcare. Expansion is being contested
in the Supreme Court. Regardless of the judgment,
and I think we’ll win, there will be no turning back the clock on expanded access to care. So on now to the next challenge. How can we as a country cover
the bill that’s coming due? Not just for the newly
covered but for all of us. I fly a lot, I have TSA
precheck, it’s great. I walk right through security. Recently as I approached
the metal detector a very pleasant young
man looked me up and down and asked, do you have
any artificial joints? I said no, they’re all original
parts, thanks very much. One thing you can count on, baby boomers will not age cheaply. New hips, new knees, we’ll
take two of everything. Thank you very much. Healthcare with the increasing
bionic baby boomers afoot could consume the
majority of federal budget if we continue to
provide care the same way as we do today. Already we pay twice
as much for each person as any other country. Improving the quality
and cost of healthcare remains an essential national priority. And aside from demographics,
there’s two reasons we see these high costs. One is that we have an
ineffective marketplace and benefit plan
structures that insulate us from the cost of services. These issues are being addressed
through marketplace reform. But the second major driver
of the excessive costs is the way we pay providers. Today, we’re paid for the services, or the fragments of care we
deliver, not the outcomes. A hospital admission, an
x-ray, a doctor visit, generates a payment. An effective transition
from hospital to home or an admission avoided for
congestive heart failure because of great care,
produces no payment. The explosion in diagnostic
and therapeutic technology over the past 30 years has given us many more fragments of care
to provide and be paid for. Our delivery system has adapted. We now have SNFists,
hospitalists, intensivists, even laborers to care for moms in labor. Deliverers may be right around the corner. You all have many more
options than we ever did. We’ve consciously fragmented care and left the patient and
family to fill the gaps expecting them to integrate and coordinate their own care. It’s no wonder that almost
20% of Medicare patients leaving the hospital with an average of 12 different medications are
readmitted within 30 days. Despite our best intentions, we do what we’re paid
to do and the result is our expensive and fragmented care system. If we want to become a system
that provides better outcomes we’ll have to reward
providers to deliver it and the Affordable Care Act did include new models of ACOs and episode payments intended to support coordinated care. Private payers are moving this way as well and this growing momentum nationally to make these payment models the norm. Let’s assume that we
will successfully change our payment systems over
the next three to five years while you all complete your training. You will begin practice then in a system that rewards us for
delivering better health, better care in lower costs
for the people you serve. That leaves one big question. Actually maybe two big questions. Grey’s, did you really
have to kill off McDreamy? You do watch that? Alright, one big question: how do we transform our
care delivery system, create new care models that
produce these outcomes? Across the US there are 18
million healthcare workers including 3.9 million nurses
and 900,000 physicians. They work in 5,000 hospitals and across hundreds of
thousands of other locations. They’re the one that have to understand and implement these new care models. Institutional and individual
change is very difficult. This is massive change that
will ultimately involve and touch every person in this system. And these new care models must be designed to meet all of a patient’s needs not just a symptom or a condition. To accomplish this, we have
to understand patient’s needs the way patients feel them. I recently recalled an embarrassing medical school lesson about this. My third year year medical
rotation was with John Harvey. Along with Proctor Harvey, one of the great Georgetown
internists of that period. We were gathered around the
bed, thoroughly captivated as he interviewed and examined a patient. When he left the room,
Dr. Harvey directed us to a nearby room, looked at me and said, Rick, lay down on the bed. He put his foot up on the rail of the bed and shook it and he said, imagine
you’re that patient, Rick, how does that feel? Apparently, I’d put my
foot on the patient’s bed and I didn’t even know it. I’m sure the patient did. To design and operate our new system, to really understand our patient’s needs, we have to start by putting
ourselves in the bed. At Trinity, we’ve framed
this change effort as building a people
centered health system. It means we will design and deliver care starting from the patient’s needs, not from ours, the provider’s, as we have so often done in the past. I come to you today with a simple request. Please help us build a people
centered health system. People centered thinking is not the norm for us in healthcare. At least not yet. In our system, we’re now
trying to include consumers directly in our planning process and we also recently
created a simple tool. We call it the people centered time out to help us maintain this focus. You’re all aware of the time
out concept from the OR. When the surgeon says time out and the team runs through
a pre-op checklist. This tool has significantly improved patient safety and outcomes. Now in our system when
we’re debating priorities, thinking about designing a new lab process or discussing visiting
hours, any member of the team is empowered to call a
people centered time out. Our discussion starts anew. We take the perspective
of a person or family being cared for in our system and we ask ourselves how
would we choose priorities, how would we design the
lab or set visiting hours. We integrate the results of these ideas into our conversation. We think doing this significantly
expands our thinking and will lead to better discussions. As you move on to new
lives and new institutions, try this out for yourselves. It works at almost any
level and any issue. When you’re uncertain about how to talk to a patient about a difficult diagnosis or construct a coverage schedule, take a people centered time out, pause, see yourself as the patient in the bed or in a wheelchair and ask, how would I want to hear about my diagnosis. How would I want to be
covered over the weekend? Use that reflection to
guide your discussion. Now this may sound like a simple idea. Surely there are more technical
things to think about. There are and we think
about them all the time, but technical answers are easy. Changing behavior is hard. We have to systematically work at it. Like the surgical checklist, this could be a very simple but
powerful tool to help you be sure your work remains grounded in the needs of the people you serve. He’s an example of what care could like in a people centered health system. In Atlanta there’s a small
village of shacks next to a swamp that have been constructed
by homeless folks. They call it Hut City. At dusk one evening, I was
with a mobile care team from Mercy Care making a home call for a couple in their late 50s. We were standing under a plastic tarp that served as an awning
over a dirt floor patio. A rusted table was circled by four mismatched old patio chairs and behind the patio was a
small hut about six by 18 feet. An Emory medical student sat at the table, her head lamp shining on the woman’s arm as she checked her blood pressure. And the dusk scene was further illuminated by the global laptop
PC wirelessly connected to our electronic medical record and to Grady Hospital a few miles away. The woman expressed concern
about her spouse’s need for followup at one of our clinics. At the end of the visit, we left a bottle of new medication for her
and made an appointment for her spouse at our clinic. Care can be very different if we design around the needs of
patients not our own needs. In a few weeks as interns and residents you’ll be more directly
responsible for clinical decisions. I know some of you are
wondering, am I ready? What happens if I make a mistake? Remember the sisters in the mining camps and the hospital ships? Many had no training. Imagine their doubts. Recently a very wise advisor said to me, every leader has doubts and
feels like a fraud at times, surgeons excluded of course. (crowd laughing) The reality is that while
you have much to learn you are very well trained and you’re part of a team. On a good team, your colleagues
will be there for you. Particularly the nurses who are so much more
experienced than you will be. So be an effective team member. Be humble, be curious,
be bold, laugh a lot, enjoy your work and celebrate your team. And more than anything else remember that listening well to your patients is the starting point
of great patient care. The transformation of our healthcare system is now possible. We have all the elements to succeed. You’re entering a wonderful profession at an extraordinary time. When I graduated from Georgetown
Medical School in 1976 we thought we would create a system that would be accessible to all. We tried a lot and learned a lot. The science of healthcare
has progressed tremendously, but we did not get that done. You can. You are the first generation
of post ACA physicians. You’ll be coming of age
in a transformed system poised like never before
to provide every American an equal opportunity to
reach their potential for a healthy life. I’m confident it will happen. You started it and you will get it done. Your patients will be better and America will be stronger as a result. Enjoy this special day with your family. Congratulations to each
and every one of you. The Georgetown Medical
School Class of 2015 on your very special achievement today. Thank you all very much. (crowd applauding) – Dean Mitchell will present the graduates assisted by Associate Dean Cameron Jones. President John DeGioia
will confer the degrees assisted by registrar John Hammett. – President DeGioia, this
is a truly remarkable class and it’s fitting that we return here to this historic old
theater for the first time since the class graduated here in 1870. This class includes at
least two members who won NCAA national championships
in lacrosse and basketball. (crowd cheering) They were not Georgetown
championships but … Numbers of Georgetown’s Class of 2015 have won intermural
championships and of course numerous members were
members of the championship powder puff team and the Fairfax County champion Ice Dogs by the way. Over half will go to top 25% programs. They’ve done thousands of hours
of service in inner city DC. Hundreds of hours of research with mentors in labs at our institution and others and they left this city and
this school better as a result. We will honor them this afternoon. We will also acknowledge academic
honors, Alpha Omega Alpha. The peer nominated and
elected Gold Humanism Society and a number of academic focused tracks. The 163rd medical school
class to graduate, this class provides us a good
cross section of the nation. Among 186 graduates today,
there are 93 men and 93 women. (crowd applauding) The youngest is 25 and the
most experienced is 37. 34 of the states are
represented, lead by California, New York, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and New Jersey. 33 members of the class
have a graduate degree. Family members who are
serving as special hooders for their graduate should make their way to stage right at this time. Our staff will assist you
in getting to the stage at the appropriate time. The graduating class
is elected to be hooded by the following members of the faculty: Dr. Princy Kumar, professor of medicine, chief of infectious disease, senior associate dean for students. (crowd applauding) Rebekah Evangelista,
associate professor of surgery and clerkship director in
the department of surgery. Sean Welton, associate
professor and clerkship director in the department of medicine. Michael Adams, professor of medicine, vice chair of education
and program director in the department of medicine. (crowd applauding) Mary Furlong, professor and
director of medical education in the department of pathology. (crowd applauding) And Russ Wall, professor and chair of the department of anesthesia. (crowd applauding) We’ll now ask the graduates
to begin to process. Neema Agdam. Imron Ikbal Al Araqia. Jacqueline Antoinishek. Jennifer Claire Aronica,
Alpha Omega Alpha, cum laude. Michael Robert Akenbal Alexander Bellekofski Christina Marie Bents,
Alpha Omega Alpha, cum laude Connor Samuel Benton,
Gold Humanism Society. Jeffrey Guiyan Ben, Gold
Humanism, Health Justice Scholar. Lauren W. Bierman. Janine Lane Boylieu Lindsey Nicole Boyers, Gold Humanism Heather Elizabeth Boyton, Gold Humanism, Health Justice Scholar Maria T. Brellineau Jacob Ross Bronstein Erin Nichol Brooks Hayley Anne Bunting Benjamin H. Capper, Alpha Omega Alpha. Mary Elizabeth Card, Gold
Humanism, Health Justice Scholar Ryan Joseph Carpenter Mathew Frank Carpinello, Gold Humanism Charles Mario Cassasa IV Michael Paul Catalino, Gold Humanism Samantha Skilkin Catlett, cum laude. Thomas Phillip Cestar William Cavanaugh Chapman Jr.
AOA, Gold Humanism, cum laude David Archibald Cheever,
Health Justice Scholar Duan Chen Amy Umfong Chang Blake Lucas Choplan Robert Anthony Christian, Gold Humanism James Clark Jr. Samuel Fredrick Webster Clark Tavia M. Collins-Mitchell Brinn Shannon Connor, Alpha Omega Alpha Nicole McRory Constance Alexandria Julie Coughlan, Gold Humanism. Alexis Lynn Crawley. Mary Catherine Daley Rebecca Dang Wally Elias Danish Catherine Sarah Dabitoff, Gold Humanism Christopher Davies Agakhan Puno DeCastro Tensae Demesee Nicole Channing Devinish Kelly Catherine DeLorenzo Virgina Ann Dines, Alpha
Omega Alpha, magna cum laude Katherine Lynetsky Duncan,
Alpha Omega Alpha, cum laude Michael Ryan Evie Suliman Salahoudin El Amin Kevin Patrick Emmerich, Alpha Omega Alpha Victoria Eng Armond Michael Esmaley Allison Claire Estep Daniel Sun Young Eum, cum laude Robert Morton Farney Islam Fahed Amy Catherine Fairman Laura N. Felder, Alpha Omega Alpha, Health Justice Scholar, cum laude Bess Madeline Fleishner Julie Furst Heather Melville Gianini,
Alpha Omega Alpha, Gold Humanism, cum laude Benjamin Gilaberte Christopher Michael Griney Valerie Christine Grant Charles Patrick Hannon, Alpha
Omega Alpha, Gold Humanism Elizabeth Harken Heather Marie Hopkits Byron Douglas Hughes,
Health Justice Scholar George Sobe Ibrahim Kelly Beth Akime Ishahara – You ready, smile. (crowd laughing and clapping) – Sanjay Jilage Megan Marie Jani, Gold Humanism Da David Jang Kirte Jay Jilhal Donovan W. Johnson Peter Christian Johnson, Alpha Omega Alpha Nicole Beth Kalinski Odanan Karim Brigette Page Kaufman, Alpha
Omega Alpha, magna cum laude Jeffrey Randall Kaupf Jared Michael Keller Tyler James Kent Andrew Charles Karr Satindurpal Singh Karra Christine Meran Ken Elizabeth Migas Kim Kadru Andrew King Katherine Sarah King Samuel Harry Klaitman Steven Daniel Kozusko, cum laude Rebecca N. Kumar, Gold Humanism Megan Katherine Kuscko Susie Suyong Kwan Elizabeth Kathleen Landry,
Alpha Omega Alpha, cum laude Richard Alexander Lane,
Health Justice Scholar, Medical Education Research Lawrence Lester Singwing Lao Diana Katherine Lee Theresa May Lee, Health Justice Scholar Derrick W. Leon Sarah Lofton, Alpha Omega
Alpha, Gold Humanism, cum laude Kristin Elizabeth Madison, cum laude Justine Holly Mann, cum laude Michael Christopher Mariorinzi,
Alpha Omega Alpha, cum laude Catherine Margaret Maselli,
Alpha Omega Alpha, cum laude Amy Matsen, Alpha Omega
Alpha, magna cum laude Christopher J. Maxwell Michelle Yuan Mehea William Helmsley Merwin III Kirsten Joan Mitchley, Gold Humanism Kevin James Philip Misner, cum laude Adam J. Money Patrick William Daniel Moody,
Alpha Omega Alpha, cum laude Mathew John Moynahan Priya Murkirji Megan Murphy Joseph Christopher Murray,
Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Philosophy Nikeal Krisna Murthi Ryan Daniel Navarro, Alpha Omega Alpha, Gold Humanism, magna cum laude Samantha Cass Newman Peter Nguyen Alexis K. Nichols John Edward Nolan III, Alpha Omega Alpha, summa cum laude, Gold Humanism Nodra Bisurgi Nori Mark Steven Norton, Alpha Omega Alpha, cum laude, Gold Humanism Mutza Nuyakabow, Doctor of Medicine, Masters of Public Health,
Health Justice Scholar Peter Edward O’Halloran Jessica Lynn Pancs Terina Claire Parpia, Alpha
Omega Alpha, cum laude Heather Pemberton, Alpha
Omega Alpha, magna cum laude Ashley Colleen Pfaff Ashley Luana Pirozi Emily Nicole Platts, Gold
Humanism, Health Justice Scholar Sheila Murray Plusadis Katherine Walsh Prather Megan Leer Pryor, Gold
Humanism, Health Justice Scholar Joseph Radie Joseph James Ravis III Allison Laurel Raybold, Alpha Omega Alpha, Gold Humanism, cum laude Mark J. R. Ginto Real, Gold Humanism Mary Jane McMahon Ring Julia M. Riley, Medical
Education Research, Gold Humanism Alice Hojung Rin, Health Justice Scholar Derek Knight Rogalski, magnum cum laude, Alpha Omega Alpha, Health Justice Scholar Mathew Kevin Rosen, Alpha Omega Alpha Aaron Jason Rubinstein Mark Edward Russo, cum laude Catherine Wagner Sanchez-Maldonado Maximilian Albert Schellinger Jonathan Ira Seagull, Alpha
Omega Alpha, cum laude Joanna Lee Shektal Joskaron Singh Titiloa Tomatopa Sioday Chirstopher Sonay Andrew David Stapheroni,
Alpha Omega Alpha, cum laude Camille Stephanowski Weston Scott Stover Melissa Anne Strob Cara Anne Sweeney Steven Thomas Swinford, cum laude Alexander X. Tai, cum laude Catherine Anne Tashera, Alpha Omega Alpha Claire Elizabeth Thiessen, Gold Humanism Christopher Andrew Thomas, Gold Humanism Liam Thon Tran Ann Treaton Elizabeth Carol Truelove Angli Kiyan Tsang Julia Tsay, Gold Humanism,
Health Justice Scholar Merrill Megume Uano Catherine Marie Umberfirth,
Alpha Omega Alpha Ivan Uritz Stephanie Pham Van Kurt Wagner Sundeep Singh Walia Mitchell Harrison Wexler Graham Wolf Daniel Stanley Wong Jennifer Ilin Wu Kurt Andrew Yaeger Sojin Yun Janice Helen Yun Habib George Zalzol (crowd cheering and clapping) Will the class please stand
for the conferring of degrees. This makes it legal. President DeGioia, as
dean for medical education at the Georgetown University
School of Medicine I have the honor to present
you these candidates for the degree Doctor of Medicine
and Doctor of Philosophy. They have been duly examined
and recommended by the faculty. I therefore ask that you
bestow on these students the degree Doctor of Medicine. I also ask that you bestow
on our dual degree student the Doctor of Philosophy degree. – By virtue of the authority vested in me by the Congress of the United States and by the Board of Directors
of Georgetown University I officially confer upon these candidates the degree of Doctor of
Medicine and to the one MD/PhD student I also grant the
Doctor of Philosophy. Well done. (crowd cheering and applauding) – Donald Knowlan, MD,
professor emeritus of medicine in cardiology will administer
the Oath of Hippocrates. Dr. Knowlan. – Thank you, Dr. Federoff. (crowd applauding) We want to invite all the
physicians in our audience today to join with our graduates
in reciting the oath. Please stand. Wait a minute. Repeat after me, use
your own name of course. I, Donald M. Knowlan, (crowd repeating) solemnly promise to God Almighty (crowd repeating) that according to my ability and judgment (crowd repeating) I will endeavor at all times (crowd repeating) to observe the stipulations of this oath (crowd repeating) which through ageless tradition (crowd repeating) has governed the conduct
of my predecessors (crowd repeating) and the profession which
I am about to enter. (crowd repeating) appreciating the benefits of
the instruction accorded to me (crowd repeating) I promise to esteem
and revere the teachers (crowd repeating) who have trained me in the
science and art of medicine (crowd repeating) to share my good fortune with them (crowd repeating) and to relieve their necessities
should want befall them. (crowd repeating) To all who are deserving (crowd repeating) but to none who are unworthy (crowd repeating) I will freely impart a
knowledge of my science and art. (crowd repeating) I will adhere to the doctrine
and prescribed the treatment (crowd repeating) which my ability and judgment assure me are most beneficial for my patients (crowd repeating) I will abstain from everything which may be harmful or dangerous to them. (crowd repeating) I will attempt no
treatment which evidently requires training and
skills superior to mine. (crowd repeating) (crowd laughing) Hang in there. (crowd laughing) With purity of purpose
and holiness of life (crowd repeating) I will practice my profession (crowd repeating) my every word and deed in
the homes of my patients or in other places of treatment (crowd repeating) will be directed solely to
the welfare of these patients (crowd repeating) with the help of God’s grace (crowd repeating) They will find no occasion in my speech and actions to disrespect my profession. (crowd repeating) Whatever I see or hear as
I practice my profession (crowd repeating) which should not be revealed (crowd repeating) I will not divulge because such knowledge must remain secret. (crowd repeating) As long as I keep this promise (crowd repeating) I hope to enjoy happiness in life (crowd repeating) success in my profession (crowd repeating) and the respect of my
fellow men and women. (crowd repeating) But may the reverse be my lot (crowd repeating) if I should willfully
violate my solemn word now given before God (crowd repeating) Welcome. Thank you. (crowd applauding) – President DeGioia will
now make final remarks. – Please be seated. Well thank you Dr. Federoff. This is Dr. Federoff’s
last commencement season with our community as he
moves on to the next step in his extraordinary career. I’d like to express on behalf of all of us our appreciation to Howard Federoff for his contributions and leadership throughout these past
eight years at Georgetown as he has lead Georgetown
University Medical Center and wish him well in the
next steps in his career. Howard. (crowd applauding) And on behalf of all
of us I wish to express our gratitude to Dr. Richard Gilfillan for making this very special day that much more special by sharing with us the perspective and insight gained throughout his life’s work. Dr. Gilfillan, thank you. (crowd applauding) It is a great pleasure
and privilege to be here with all of you today, back
here, as Dr. Mitchell said, in National Theatre for the first time since our commencement in
1870 to share in this moment, this celebration with
all of you, our graduates of the School of Medicine’s Class of 2015, with your families and with
our Georgetown University community here in Washington. A word of gratitude to
the many individuals who have been there for
you, those fellow students, colleagues, mentors, loved
ones, who have provided you with the support
to help you work toward your aspirations to realize your dreams. Thank you also to Dean Mitchell, to the extraordinary
faculty seated behind me, for the deep care and
commitment they invest every semester, in
teaching, in scholarship, in clinical care, in their contributions to sustaining and strengthening
the academic vibrancy of our university community. To our staff for all that they
did to make today possible and finally to our graduates, to the women and men before me. Congratulations on this very special day. (crowd applauding) This is a very special
moment in your lives. A moment of beginning, of
looking toward the future to the challenges that you will encounter, the trials you will endure,
the victories you will claim, the unique impact you will have
in the practice of medicine. It’s my sincere hope that the
support of this university which you will always call home, the friendships you have forged here, the knowledge you have earned here, will provide you with resources for each of your steps forward. As graduates of our School of Medicine, you came to Georgetown
after already achieving very high levels of
excellence in both academics and in your early careers. You came after reflecting
on your character, your aspirations, your past successes, with the hope of achieving
the depth of knowledge required to align the most
authentic aspects of yourselves with the path that you envision for yourselves in the future. This is a moment, grounded
in all of your hard work leading up to today and in
the journey of exploration that you’ve taken during
these years here at Georgetown expanding your minds and your hearts to be able to meet the needs of our world. You’ve engaged in this work at an extraordinary moment in history. We live in a world whose
boundaries are rapidly shrinking, whose opportunities are boundless but whose challenges are urgent, demanding our most serious attention. This is the 50th year since America launched its great experiment the great society, a set of
programs seeking to address some of the deepest
problems in our nation, poverty, racial injustice,
access to healthcare. One of the architects
of the great society, one of the most
distinguished public servants of the last half century was John Gardner who served as Secretary of
Health Education and Welfare during the presidency of Lyndon Johnson. When talking about the
challenges of this type of work, the paradox of taking on
such formidable tasks, Gardner noted, quote,
what we have before us are some breathtaking opportunities disguised as insoluble
problems, close quote. Breathtaking opportunities disguised as insoluble problems. This reminds us that the
hope for our societies is a matter of imagination. It is a hope built upon a persistence to always relentlessly seek
answers, find solutions, strive for the betterment
of our communities, our nations, our societies. When we take as our starting point, that breathtaking opportunities
are within our grasp, that seemingly insoluble
problems can be surmounted, it changes everything. It brings us a new lens to the questions, how can we better care for one another? How can we build our societies so that they are more inclusive? How can we together better address the challenges that confront us? Inequality, injustice,
disease around the globe. Looking at all of you, I am confident that you have the skills,
the depth of thought, fullness of heart, the imagination, to seek the betterment of humankind. To develop the mindset, the talents, the experiences, to be
principled and effective leaders in the field of medicine. And now as you graduate, as you commence, as you embark on a new
phase in your lives, as you begin your service as physicians, this is a very special time. This is your time and we
could not be more honored to share this moment with you. We could not be more proud to have been a part of your formation. Congratulations to you all
on this very special day. (crowd applauding) – The senior choir will now
lead us in our alma mater. I invite alumni to join them. If the words have escaped you, they are printed in the
back of the program. Please stand. (singing Georgetown Alma Mater) (crowd applauding) Please remain standing. Immediately following the ceremony there will be a reception
for the graduates, their families and friends on the podium in the backyard of the Georgetown
University Medical School. All are invited. Please remain in place until the academic procession is completed. Dr. Mitchell has been asked
by the graduating class to give the benediction. Dr. Mitchell. (crowd applauding) – Let us pray. Oh Lord, creator of love,
breath and life itself oh Holy Hidden Being,
we look at your world in the dark of its night. We’re left with the salty tears
and emptiness of heartbreak but here they are Lord,
here they are before you. It is they Lord, they
have heard your people crying in the night. They’re prepared, bright
and burning with passion. We stand with their families
now and launch them on along the arc of your creation. Farther than any of us can see. We know that arc bends towards justice and they will have significant impact on the trajectory toward mercy and tender care for the whole person. Lord look down up on these young souls, teach them to love the world you’ve made. Give them ears, discerning
minds, imagination and hearts to hear the
people of this night. Make them your bright and
burning morning stars of hope. Enlighten their hearts to
the immeasurable greatness of your power promised to each of us. Blessed are these feet of
those who will bring hope and good news to your people. The journey may be long,
hard, hot and tiring. Give them balance, joy, meaningful love of friends and family and
grateful hearts for the journey. These children were
born with hearts of gold but the ways of the
world can turn them cold. When they find it hard to care, give them song to sing, make them dare. Take their hopes, dreams, their minds, with plans and schemes, the very breath that sang your praise. Give them nothing more
than your love and grace. That is sufficient for lives
filled with glory and joy. Lord, we thank you for
their discerning hearts, courage and will and for
the gift of their joy and wonder of new discovery. They’re the ones who will
bring new hope to creation. We celebrate now the cures, hope and help some of them will bring for the first time ever to your world. Make them burning lights
through death’s darkness for patients and their own families. Make them a kind and hopeful light for those lost in lives of darkness. Send these lights burning forth. Keep their souls on fire
for your work in this world. Help them to fashion lives that are holy and hearts that are true. So go now young lions,
run from this school with your hearts and minds on fire. This world will never be the same. In you holy and wondrous name, Amen. (crowd applauding) (uptempo instrumental music)

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