Bernard Amadei Technion Honorary Doctor 2017

Bernard Amadei Technion Honorary Doctor 2017


As a distinguished professor of civil
engineering Bernard Amadei has always put the good of humanity first he is
co-founder of engineers Without Borders International an organization dedicated
to fostering sustainable energy projects in developing communities in 2001 he
became the founding president of the USA chapter today there are 450 chapters
worldwide including one at Technion and three others in Israel Bernard holds
the University of Colorado at Boulder Mortenson endowed chair in global
engineering his numerous awards and honors received in the field of
geomechanics attest to his brilliant career in academia he is an elected
member of the US National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of
Construction in 2013 and 2014 he was the US Science envoy to Pakistan and Nepal
he is also a board member of the US State Department Peace Techlabs Bernard
has dedicated his life to making a difference in the world by instilling
compassion and a social conscience in engineering in his students he is a true
friend of Israel and Technion where he molded the Center for Global engineering
and pioneered the course in engineering for developing communities my philosophy
for educating engineers for today’s world and for the 21st century in
general is to introduce them to some global issues what I expect engineers to
have in terms of skills and knowledge is to be able to integrate various
disciplines not just engineering disciplines but non-technical issues as
well in in the design I visited the village of San Pablo Belize in
2000-2001 and when I visited the village I met some young girls whose job was to
carry the water from the river to the village and they told me that the girls
could not go to school so they asked I could help that for me was a an
eye-opening type of event and decided that doing engineering for three to four
billion people whose job is to stay alive by the end of the day was more
important than doing engineering for the other one to two billion people so it was
really a a midlife not crisis but the midlife awakening in my engineering
career in my professional career what I found and when I started Engineers
Without Borders is that the students were extremely excited about the idea of
being able to go to the field to learn engineering by doing not only they’re
learning about engineering together but they also exposed to each other’s
cultures and that to me is the future of the planet bringing people making them
realize that we’re all part of one planet and as engineers we can
contribute to the well-being of seven eight billion people on our planet I’m
greatly honored to receive the honorary degree from the Technion in Israel this
is a unique place that have visited and interacted with alot over the past ten
years or so I remember first coming to Israel in 2007 to 2008 and working with
my colleague Mark Talesnick and that was the beginning of a long
collaboration I obviously want to make sure that this degree is not just about
me it’s about millions of volunteers who are part of Engineers Without Borders
international so I’m glad to share that doctoral degree with all those great
people

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