Breast Health – Penn State Health – Hope and Courage – 2019

Breast Health – Penn State Health – Hope and Courage – 2019


>>Tonight –>>They called us in, and said, “Hey, you
have breast cancer.”>>He was, like, really sick. He scared me, because I’ve never seen him
that sick.>>– an ABC 27 special presentation.>>To hear them say “breast cancer” for him,
I was shocked. I was upset, and I cried.>>I’m moving on with life. I’m not going to let it hold me back.>>Hope and courage, a tribute to breast health,
sponsored by Penn State Health.>>Good evening. I’m Debra Pinkerton. October is dedicated to breast cancer awareness. It’s the time of year when women and men wear
pink, and are proud to do so. The latest statistics show one in eight women
in the United States will develop breast cancer. It is the most common cancer in women in the
U.S. Men can develop it, too. This year, more than 2500 men will be diagnosed
with the disease, and tonight, you’ll meet a Dauphin County man who is part of that statistic. What is the best way to diagnose breast cancer? What are the symptoms like for a man, and
what are the latest treatment options? You will find out tonight, and if you have
questions at home, Christina Butler is here to tell you how to get them answered. Hi, Christina.>>Hi, Debra. Specialists from Penn State Health are in
the ABC 27 call center right now. They’re ready to answer your calls and answer
your questions. You can call the number on the screen until
8:00, or you can e-mail your questions during tonight’s show to [email protected] Dr. Melody Paulishak will answer your e-mails
throughout tonight’s show. All calls and e-mails are confidential, and
I’ll be back later in the show to share some of those questions with you. Back to you.>>Thanks, Christina. When we talk about breast cancer, we think
of women, but men get the disease, too. It’s rare. Less than 1% of breast cancer cases are men. We just learned that Beyonce’s father was
diagnosed with breast cancer. Well, a Dauphin County man found out that
he was part of that statistic, too. Here’s Wade Shearer’s journey.>>Altogether, between the coat, the helmet,
air pack, and all that, it’s well over 100 pounds that we’ll wear going into a fire.>>Wade Shearer knows this equipment like
the back of his hand. He’s been a firefighter for more than 30 years
–>>So we have our CPR masks, always carry
two, just never know if one doesn’t work, or something’s wrong with it.>>– and nearly that same amount of time
as an EMT. His memories are a constant reminder of why
he does it.>>I was working Chambers Hill Ambulance,
and we got dispatched to the intersection of 322 and Chambers Hill Road for a childbirth. We get them all the time. The mom’s not near ready to give birth yet,
and as we were pulling up, police officer yelled, “Get up here! I started to see the head!” And we’re like, oh, this is real, and we delivered
the baby right in the middle of the intersection. And we delivered a healthy baby girl right
there.>>Wade is always thinking of others, even
during his darkest hours. Over the past year, he’s had some.>>I was driving my truck, and I noticed that
my seat belt was causing a little discomfort in my breast. I didn’t think anything of it, thought it
was like, you know, just pressure.>>And then, one time, he’d come home, and
I’m like, honey, your nipple’s inverted. And he’s like, I didn’t notice.>>She’s like, you need to go to the doctor. I’m like — I put it off a little bit, and
then I said, “All right, I’ll go,” because it was starting to hurt.>>Wade’s physician directed him to Penn State
Health Breast Center.>>They did a mammogram, and they did an ultrasound. And they were like, right then and there,
“We’re going to biopsy it. There’s something there. We need to biopsy it.”>>And he calls me back, and he goes, “They
want me to do a biopsy today.” And I’m like, okay. Do you need me to come from work? He goes, “No, I’ll be okay,” and I’m like,
all right.>>Like a week later, they called us in, and
said, “Hey, you have breast cancer, you know. This is the results. This is what it is.”>>He had a fairly small cancer. It was located not far away from the nipple. We did a further workup, and actually found
some suspicious — what we call adenopathy, or enlarged lymph nodes under the arm, and
a biopsy of those showed that he had cancer in the lymph node, as well as having cancer
in the breast.>>To hear them say “breast cancer” for him,
I was — I was shocked. I was shocked. I was upset, and I cried.>>Me just being me, I’m like, all right,
what do we got to do? Let’s hit it on.>>So he started with his chemotherapy treatment. The sub-type of breast cancer that Wade had
was HER2 amplified breast cancer, estrogen-positive breast cancer. It always requires chemotherapy, and it requires
chemotherapy with targeted therapy. So what targeted therapy means is it’s something
combined with the chemotherapy to make the chemotherapy even more effective.>>We were going to have the chemo. We were going to do six rounds, one round
every three weeks, and we did. And that was rough. That was very rough.>>He was, like, really sick. He scared me, because I’ve never seen him
that sick. I mean, he’s a man of movement, and if he’s
not moving, there’s definitely something wrong. So it was scary.>>During the roughest times, there was hope.>>I think it was the third round — my nipple
came back out, and I noticed it. And she noticed it. I’m like — so I sent a picture to Dr. Dodge,
and she’s like, that’s awesome. That’s what we — the tumor shrunk three-quarters
its size from the chemo. [ Bell Ringing ] I’m like, all right, sweet, I’m done with
chemo. Let’s do surgery. Let’s get it out of my body, you know.>>So one of the advantages of giving the
chemotherapy first for Wade was that we were able to not only see how his tumor responded,
but that response allowed us to keep his nipple. Because the tumor shrank, I was able to get
negative margins when I did his partial mastectomy, and leave him with a much better cosmetic
result.>>After his surgery, what happened is the
tumor was examined closely by a pathologist, who detects what residual cancer was left
following the six cycles of targeted therapy and chemotherapy. And then, based on that, we were able to decide
the next parts of his treatment, which, in Wayne’s case, involved radiation, and also
more targeted systemic therapy.>>Wade went through a month of radiation,
and he just finished six months of targeted systemic therapy, almost a year after he was
diagnosed.>>He’s been a true champion. To see him at his worst, and then to see him
now is a big change. Big man, big change. So I’m happy that we’ve made it through this.>>I’m moving on with life. I’m not going to let it hold me back because
I had cancer, you know. I’m going to say I beat it, and then moved
on.>>He’s a fighter, and he wants to help other
people fight. So, it’s good.>>A year that has changed Wade’s life, and
now he hopes to change others.>>I’m going to try to use myself like an
example kind of, you know, for other people to see that — yeah, it kicks you. It knocks you down, but you can get back up. And when you get back up, you’re stronger,
because you have that little badge of course that — you know, inside you, that says, “You
know, I beat that.”>>Wade says he took this really big negative
and turned it into a big positive. He really hopes to help others who are going
through this same thing. Now joining us Dr. Daleela Dodge, Wade’s surgeon. He’s such a great guy.>>He is. He’s amazing.>>In the past 11 years that we’ve been doing
this show, this is the first time that we have featured a male breast cancer patient,
so it is rare.>>Well, it is. Only about 2700 cases a year in the United
States, but it’s 2700. And it’s a little more common in men that
are of African-American descent, and we have to be aware of it. And we have to know how to treat it. So we thought it was an important thing to
bring forth in this program.>>Now, since men don’t typically get mammograms
like women do, how do they detect breast cancer?>>Well, we have a term called breast awareness,
and women are supposed to breast aware as well. So there are signs and symptoms. There’s the mass, the palpable thing that
we feel, but there are also other subtle things — pulling on the skin, a change in the direction
of the nipple, a discharge from the nipple, or some area of rash or redness that doesn’t
go away. All those things can be signs of breast cancer,
and they warrant evaluation.>>And pretty much the same signs that a woman
would have.>>Absolutely. Absolutely.>>Now, in Wade’s case, he had both chemotherapy
and radiation. Why do — in some cases, do you need both,
and in some cases, you don’t?>>So some tumors require chemotherapy, because
they’re already aggressive enough, and because they’re sensitive to it. And chemotherapy treats the entire body. It catches any cells that may have escaped
from the tumor. So when our lymph nodes already have cancer
and so on, often, it — we need that type of therapy to do well. We may also need pills as well, and that works
systematically. Radiation only works where we give it, so
it helps prevent the cancer from coming back where it occurred in the breast, but it doesn’t
affect that systemic recurrence, that chance of metastases.>>Really good explanation of the difference
between the two. Dr. Dodge, we will talk to you a little bit
later in the show, but if you would like to make an appointment at Penn State Health Breast
Center, call 866-204-8414. Let’s check in with Christina Butler in the
ABC 27 call center. How are the calls going there, Christina?>>Hi again, Debra. The calls are coming in, and a reminder that
you can call in until 8:00 tonight. The number is 717-346-3333. Here to answer our viewer questions tonight,
Nichole Cook, breast-imaging navigator. Thanks for joining us. Let’s jump right into our first question. “I was just recently diagnosed with breast
cancer. The amount of information I’m receiving is
overwhelming. How do you help your patients keep everything
straight?”>>I always tell them, you know, to bring
somebody with them to their appointments, to have a second set of ears, and it’s always
good to have a journal. You know, keep it by your bed, write down
questions. They come to you at night when you’re sleeping
sometimes, so it’s good to, you know, do things like that. And then, you know, you can always rely on
your nurse navigator if you are stuck with something that you don’t understand. You know, you can call her, and they’re usually
keeping tags on everything. So –>>They’ll walk you right through it. Okay, thanks. We’ll be back with you in just a bit. If you have a question, and you can’t get
through on the phones, you can e-mail your questions to [email protected] Stay with us. We’ll be right back. [ Music ]>>You’re watching “Hope and Courage, a Tribute
to Breast Health” on ABC 27, sponsored by Penn State Health.>>Welcome back. A Lebanon County woman was looking forward
to her summer break from teaching. Kelley Frew never got the break she was expecting. Here’s Kelley’s journey.>>The last one’s okay.>>Kelley Frew starts her 21st year teaching
at Milton Hershey School.>>The kids are wonderful. They’re just so welcoming, and they really
make you feel good about being a teacher there. And the staff that you work with are amazing,
and they’re all there for the same mission. And, you know, you’re all driven to make a
difference in the lives of these kids.>>Kelley is already knee-deep in schoolwork.>>I teach pre-calc trig to mostly 11th and
12th-grade students, and then I have an algebra II class that I teach to mostly 11th-grade
students.>>It’s truly amazing that Kelley is back
in the classroom. While the kids had the summer off, she had
to study a topic that was unfamiliar to her — cancer.>>I went — I think it was the last week
of April, I had my first mammogram. And both my mom and the staff had talked to
me about the fact — when you have a first mammogram, you’re probably going to get called
back, because they don’t have a baseline or anything to compare it to.>>As Kelley expected, she got a call back
for more images and an ultrasound. What she wasn’t expecting is what they said.>>They said, “We would like to biopsy some
of the areas, just to see what’s going on.” And so then, that was the first time when
I got a little bit nervous.>>After the biopsy, Kelley and Mark found
out the results.>>And they told us that it was, in fact,
cancer, news that they really didn’t want to, you know — to deliver.>>The diagnosis came back as ductal carcinoma
in situ with microinvasion. Ductal carcinoma in situ means where we have
these abnormal cancer cells that are still inside the cut, and hers were called high-grade,
so meaning they’re very abnormal-looking. She also had small areas of what are called
microinvasion. It’s where those cancer cells are just starting
to break through the lining of the duct.>>Even though they kept trying to reassure
us that it was early, and it’s treatable and stuff, but — I mean, anytime anybody uses
the word “cancer,” it’s a really scary thought.>>You walk out with a book about breast cancer,
and you walk out with a binder about cancer in general. And it was overwhelming.>>We also recommended that she be seen by
a genetic counselor, due to the fact that she was only 42 at time of diagnosis.>>Your genetic testing results can really
be telling of how you’re going to treat, you know, the breast cancer, and what you’re going
to do moving forward.>>She ended up being found to have a BRCA
II mutation, which elevates her risk of developing a second cancer in the future.>>They were very reassuring that this is
treatable. We can be aggressive. We can get it quickly, and she can have a
healthy, normal life.>>That really prompted me to make the decision
of the choice of treatment that I did. So because of the BRCA II and the breast cancer
gene, I chose to — or elected to have a bilateral mastectomy.>>For all my patients that are considering
mastectomy, I strong encourage them to see plastic surgery. It doesn’t mean they have to have reconstruction,
but I think they should weigh their options, the pros and the cons.>>I like to spend a lot of time doing education,
talking about the different options for breast reconstruction, and then finding out from
the patient what truly is important to them, in terms of recovery, and expectations for
appearance.>>Thinking about reconstruction — you know,
they talked about — and a lot of research has shown that it’s just a little easier to
do it right away, so I opted and elected to do that.>>What we performed was bilateral mastectomies,
and we called it skin sparing, meaning we left as much of the skin as we needed or could
to allow Dr. Henry to have all the skin she needs for reconstruction.>>In most patients, you end up having to
do a staged reconstruction, where you start with a tissue expansion of some kind. We started with a fairly minimal volume in
the tissue expanders, and then she was allowed to heal for several weeks after surgery. And she was also feeling a lot better from
a pain and an energy standpoint. We started the expansions in the office.>>Some final steps to complete this journey,
just in time for the start of school –>>I had to be back at school on August 13th,
so almost five weeks after surgery. I was ready to go. I felt good, and so I wanted to get in there. And it was okay.>>She’s doing great, absolutely. She is 100% active, and involved in everything
she was pre-surgery, and pre-cancer.>>And the start of the school year is off
and running, and we’re in the midst of it. And I feel — I feel good, and I’ve come out
on the other side of it.>>Kelley spent only one night in the hospital. She said the recovery process went a lot smoother
than she thought it would. Joining us now is Dr. Kristine Widders, co-director
of Penn State Health Breast Center, and also Kelley’s surgeon. Talk to about coordination of care. How does it work there at the Breast Center?>>One thing that’s really unique to our breast
center, I think, is that everyone is housed in the same location. We have breast surgery, radiology, radiation
oncology, plastic surgery, as well as our genetic counselors. This allows us as providers to easily communicate,
and allows an ease for patients as they navigate the system.>>Oh, I’m sorry.>>I was going to say — we also have great
nurse navigators. We have Sarah and Nichole, who work at our
Penn State Hershey Breast Center. We also have Joanie [assumed spelling], who’s
at our new Lime Spring location.>>Now, most of the patients that we saw tonight
— or were seeing tonight are young in age, so does that mean we’re detecting it earlier,
sooner, or are there more cases?>>The National Institute of Health released
recent data from 2012 to 2016, and about 30% of new cancer diagnoses were in women younger
than age 54. Also, the American Cancer Society had some
recent data, and they are seeing a slight increase in trend in women younger than 40
getting breast cancer. I also think it’s partly that women in this
age group are surviving more and more, so we’re hearing more about it. We still recommend that women over 40 get
an annual mammogram. We also recommend that women really talk to
their providers about their breast cancer risk.>>Kelley had indicated that it was difficult
to tell her children that she had breast cancer. How do you deal with that, as far as helping
them through that process?>>Cancer is never something easy to hear
as a patient, nor easy to say to your family. Cancer, I also believe, is not something that
should be fought alone. I cannot say thank you enough to the countless
family, friends, and community organizations that support our patients. We also have an amazing staff that walks patients
through their medical treatment. We have two nurse navigators that do a great
job with support groups. They also lead Climb, a program for children
of patients with metastatic disease, and we had a psychiatrist last year who led a couples’
retreat for some of our breast cancer patients.>>Okay, lots of good information. Thank you, Dr. Widders. And if you would like to make an appointment
at Penn State Health Breast Center, call 866-204-8414. And let’s go back to the ABC 27 call center. Christina?>>Hi again, Debra. We’re back with Nichole Cook. We want to go right to our next viewer question,
and this person says, “Is Penn State Health planning any screenings or events for breast
cancer month?”>>The answer to that is yes. We have extended our hours into several evenings
in October, so that, you know, we can fit everybody in. Also, I just want to mention — and you can
see the times on the screen, right? Okay, and I also want to mention — we just
had a caller who asked if you can have a screening mammogram if you have breast implants, and
the answer to that is yes. You can. So everyone can come and get screened.>>Okay, thanks for letting us know about
that call. That’s good information, and we do have the
information on our screen right there. To register for either location, Hershey or
Lime Springs, you can call 1-800-243-1455. Nichole, thank you for your time, for answering
our viewer questions tonight. Thanks to all of the providers here answering
questions. Debra, back to you.>>Thanks, Christina. A Lancaster County woman never expected to
get a mammogram when she was 33 years old. It’s a day she’ll never forget. Here’s Angie Zeigler’s journey. Angie Zeigler and her boyfriend, Kevin Rosato,
have dated for more than four years. They have plans for a future together — a
future that includes starting a family, but those plans were put on hold.>>April comes around, and I found a lump. It was located in my left breast, very close
to the nipple. It felt — it was hard.>>So at Penn State Health Lime Spring office,
Angie had a mammogram, an ultrasound, a biopsy, and an MRI — images that revealed much more
than what they were expecting.>>You can see the cancer that she felt in
the left breast, but look here in the right breast. This is the cancer that we had no idea was
there, based on the mammography, and then as you scroll further up through this, and
you find this other area of cancer right here, also in the left breast. So she had bilateral cancer.>>Came home with a book, and we were looking
at books, and pictures, and all this stuff detailing what kind of cancer she has, and
so on and so forth.>>I was very like, okay, let’s get it done. Let’s be active. Let’s do it. Just whatever we need to do, let’s do it.>>We spoke in depth about considering mastectomy
as opposed to breast-conserving surgery, but Angie very much wanted to keep her breasts
if she could do so safely, without compromising her risk of survival.>>Angie chose to have a partial mastectomy. A week before the surgery, doctors placed
markers on the tumor sites.>>In Angie’s case, two of these were smaller,
and weren’t something that I could feel. So we placed what’s called a savvy scout. We now have a new radar clip that we can put
in, that I have a little device in the operating room that tells me exactly where that clip
is. So I put this probe right over the area, and
I know exactly where the tumor is.>>The latest in technology that made a difference
in Angie’s surgery.>>What we’re doing in a partial mastectomy
is we’re taking the cancer and some surrounding tissue. In this case, we’re taking additional surrounding
tissue, similar to what they do in a breast reduction surgery, cosmetically, to allow
us to move the tissue in a way where the patient’s breast contour ends up being the most aesthetically
pleasing, and in her case, symmetric.>>It was Dodge who came down and said, “We
got all the cancerous tumors. We got the nodes out. We’re going to check them. As far as the eye can see, she’s clear for
now,” and that was a little overwhelming. It’s great news. I think me and her mom kind of fell apart
there for a minute, but it was all happy tears.>>Several weeks after the surgery, Angie
and Kevin soon realized their fight wasn’t over.>>We tested the tumor for oncotype, which
is a 21-gene assay that tells us whether this cancer is likely to recur, or less likely
to recur. It showed that her cancer was actually much
more aggressive than what we would’ve expected, just looking at the markers that we had to
that point. She had an oncotype of 27, which put her in
the range where, in addition to taking the anti-estrogen pill, we recommended chemotherapy.>>But I’ll be fine. I’m very — I’m very positive about it. I have a great, great support team. Hair, I’m not so worried about. It’ll come back. It’s that sickness. I don’t want to be sick.>>Not the news we wanted, but it’s the news
we got. So we’re going to do the chemo, and kick its
butt.>>Before the treatments started, doctors
made sure Angie’s dream of a family could come true.>>So right now, I’m going through fertility
treatments in order to preserve embryos.>>And unfortunately, the treatments that
we give, both the anti-estrogen and the chemotherapy, can induce early menopause, and rob a woman
of her opportunity to have children. So what we can do is, we can give patients
medicines that stimulate hyperovulation, and then harvest those eggs, and then preserve
them, freeze them for the future, to allow them to have children, and that’s what she
had done.>>I just want one child, one — you know,
if I’m blessed with more — but just one [laughter].>>It was important to me to keep Angie’s
hopes and dreams alive, to eventually have a baby, and have our own little family.>>Angie went through her fertility treatments,
and now is on chemotherapy. Joining us again is Dr. Dodge. So having a family was really important for
Angie. What do you do as far as fertility for patients?>>I think the most important thing is that
any woman that’s in childbearing years — we can’t forget while we’re treating their cancer
to ask them whether they still want to have children, and to make sure that we step back
and get them to a fertility expert if they do.>>And Angie received most of her care at
the new Penn State Health Lime Spring location. It’s a beautiful facility. Tell us — what is offered there?>>All of diagnostic mammography is there,
so we can do any kind of imaging. We have breast MRI there as well. Biopsies are done there. Surgeons are seeing consults for benign and
malignant breast disease. We have a high-risk assessment there in clinic,
and we’re also now going to be offering genetics.>>Okay, thank you so much for all the information
tonight, Dr. Dodge.>>Absolutely.>>And we also want to thank you, our viewers,
for sharing your stories, and sending in your questions. If you would like more information, or if
you would like to schedule an appointment with Penn State Health Breast Center, call
866-204-8414, or visit online at hmc.pennstatehealth.org. We want to thank you for watching tonight,
and we wish you good health. [ Music ]

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