Cattle Welfare

Cattle Welfare


– It’s still a lot of similarities, you know when you can see skeletal issues you know there’s a problem in there, when they’re obese,
there’s a problem in there. So the body condition score is basically one that helps you determine what’s too fat, what’s too skinny. It could be a nutritional issue. It could be a health issue. It could be just a disease or something that’s going through. We don’t know. Just because it’s one way, there might be something because
it’s the other way, okay? It could be like cattle
during certain times they need more nutrients. There may be food out
there but it may not have enough quality of food
in the feed, or the hay. Basically a lot of this
I’ve already said but basically this is what is
required from the animal may be different than
what food is available. Does that make sense? We have hay out there but
if it’s low nutrients, they can eat all they want and they’re not gonna gain weight, they’re not gonna appear healthy, okay? One is emancipated, I mean this is bones, again kind of like the horses. One through three, the
skinnier the more bones the more angularity of the animal, we know we have a problem. When we get through four, five and six, we can see there’s some muscle. The ribs are starting to not be seen. The angularity of the hips
and the hooks and the pins, they’re starting to be covered. The backbone is starting to be covered. We are starting to get square in the hip because we have muscle tissue now. When we starting getting there, we’re talking about basically obese. There’s not very many like
that but they are out there. Most of them are gonna be
in that four to six range. When we’re talking about breeding cycles we wanna try to keep them
in that five to six range. Now just because I call it a five and you call it a six, that’s not a problem. But if you call a three
and he calls it an eight, we know we have some issues. And you can split the difference
between a five and six, you can say five and a half. These are the body points. You have your hooks, which is number four. Your pins are number three. And basically that’s this area, your hip area is what that is. One is the back then the loin. Two is a tail head and if
that tail is like this, you’ve got some problems. When it starts filling
out over that hip area over that tail head and gets fatty tissue that’s what we like. Then your brisket and
ribs are all in the front and of course, more ribs you see the lower the number it is. This is that tail head
area, right through here. That’s just a different side of it. The fatter that is up there, the healthier that animal is as far as a body condition score. If it’s real narrow like this, you know there’s a health
issue of some type. Is it a 12 year old cow, you know, that makes a difference
because we have teeth issues. If it’s a three year old
cow and she’s like this you know there’s something going on. Is it nutrient? We don’t know. That’s something where you
have to start checking out. There’s the vertebrae. Like I said, if you can
see that bone up there, it’s not good, we wanna see
it covered a little bit. If you can see the back side of the ribs, that’s not good. You might see some at the fronter side but you don’t want to see any in the back. Okay this cow on top, you don’t see any angularity do we? Hips are covered, no ribs, she’s gonna be in that seven range. Tail head is full. When we get down and I
realize this is a black cow, black hatted which is hard to see. But you can tell, you can
see the bones up there. You can see a tail head. You can tell she’s hungry for some reason. That ones probably
around that three range. The four, five and six, like I said four is little less, you can see more ribs three to five. When we get to body
condition score of five, we’re talking about one to two ribs. And if you don’t see any ribs, that’s a six okay? But you can definitely tell
between a six and obese. You can tell that there’s fat everywhere, in the brisket, tail head, udders you can tell a lot of difference. Like here it says a little
bit of a spine is showing versus that one awhile ago number three, you could tell even in black
hatted that she was very thin. You could tell that through
basically a poor picture. Number two you can see several ribs. Number three, she’s still got
some angularity in the hips. Four, she’s starting to get
covered up a little bit. Five, you don’t see any ribs you really don’t see any angularity. You can tell she’s
healthy, she looks good. Number six, we’re getting more healthy. And seven, see we’ve got
a lot of fat through here. But see how square they
are when we start talking about that compared to number two. And number three see how she’s sunk in, lost a lot of the muscle tone to her. So if you guessed on a number, what kind, where are
we talking about here, a body condition score. How many ribs do you see? Do you see the hips? Do you see the spine? At the most three, two
maybe, two to three, somewhere along in there. That ones got a lot of issues. You know, you see a herd of
these something like this. There’s a problem, that’s when you start visiting with the owner. If it’s one out of a herd, you not really worried
about that situation. I might see a bone in there, do ya’ll? Probably so. Loaded them up, you’re not gonna be able to just rush them in there. You’re gonna have to make them easy. You don’t want them in
there packed so much because if they do fall down then they’re gonna get trampled
on, things like that. That would be my thought on that. Some of these cattle haulers, their trailers, they jam them pack full. But they generally don’t look like that, you know the picture before. This ones a two, like I said you can see spine, you can see there’s no hips in there. She’s lost her muscle. You can see ribs. This ones got some problems. She’s not, I mean she looks
like she’s kind of healthy but she’s hungry. Her ears are up, she’s looking at you. When we go to here again, healthy. She looks healthy but you can tell thin. You know, she don’t need
to go any lower than this but she’s in that line. If you have a herd of
these there’s a problem. If it’s one, you know maybe it’s sickness. Maybe you got a disease. Here you can still see the angularities. Loss of muscle mass. Tail head’s not full. You can see some ribs, the back bone. But what’s right beside her? Calf. Standing in a pasture there, so she’s getting some groceries. She’s doing good on that side but is it the calf that’s
pulling the nutrients away or is she not getting
enough nutrients at all. Here we go, we got angularity is not near as bad, a few ribs. Starting to see a little bit there, a little bit of muscle
tone coming back in. You can still see the back
bone but it’s not near angular. You can start see some filling out there. And she’s in a pasture
there so you can tell, fresh green grass, she’s not hurting. And nothing out even behind her, that one looks good, those look good. So there’s something with that, maybe she just got the calf pulled off, we don’t know but she
ought to be, she’s okay. Here getting a drink of water. When they get a drink of water they will fill up in this
area right along in here. But you can tell, her tail head’s full. She’s getting muscle tone. She’s non angular. You can see just a bump or
two of ribs right there, very good health. Again, what are some causes? Is it just because she had a calf and she’s pulled down more nutrients? It is because the land
owner does not know, or the producer? I’ve got 20 head on two acres, well they’re starving to death. You have to take some cautions in there. Finances. Are they hoarding them type situation? If it’s one or two it’s
probably not a problem. But if it’s the whole herd
like that, that’s different. They’re healthy cattle,
they bring them up to a lot and they got a lot of
20 head in a small area, if they got a truck
coming in that afternoon that’s not that big a deal. But if they’ve been in that
small area for two weeks, that’s a problem. Mental illness and
hoarding, like we discussed. Do they just not know? We talked about the body condition score. When we get in that four, five and six that’s where 90, a high
percent of them are. Wild fire, back in last year I think, about this time last year, they lost a lot of grazing opportunities, fences were down. Did something like that come through? So yeah those cattle, they’re gonna be a little bit poor health. But you know situation. You just gotta look at
the whole situation. See what the producer’s doing. Is it one, is it the whole herd? Just make some common sense
and maybe ask some questions. Cruelty. Are hot shots cruel? I don’t know. I don’t know. Now a days we’re going to a softer side and you use the rods with a flag on them and it makes that noise. You know that turns them right there. Did it have a wire wrapped around them? Been out in the pasture, hadn’t been seen? It’s hard to tell. But if you see someone hurting it, like you said, picture in time. Are they branding it? Are they trying to help for the future? Vaccinations. You gotta find out the whole scenario. Well it depends on the type of cattle and it depends upon what
forage you’re talking about. Wheat pasture is two probably. – [Audience] Two? – Is that pretty close? Wheat pasture, how many head per cattle? Now if you’re talking about native grass probably 10 acres per one head or pair. So there’s a difference, depends upon the animal
itself, animal unit plus your forage.

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