Collaborating to Conquer Cancer: 20 Years of the NCCCP

Collaborating to Conquer Cancer: 20 Years of the NCCCP


Hello, I’m Dr. Lisa Richardson, director
of CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control. This year, we are celebrating 20 years of
the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program. Comprehensive cancer control brings together state, tribal,
territorial, and local health departments, community organizations, health care providers,
decision makers, cancer survivors and their caregivers, and others to put cancer
control into action in our communities. From the beginning of the initiative,
our partners believed the best way to work together would be to bring together stakeholders at the smallest geographic level to solve the cancer problem relevant to the population affected. Early discussions focused on establishing
and supporting the coordination of on-the-ground efforts at the state, tribal, territorial,
and local level. Identifying gaps and ways to address cancer control is more effective as a collaborative effort. So, twenty years ago, in 1998, CDC funded five states and one tribal organization to do cancer control planning. And that was the beginning of the National
Comprehensive Cancer Control Program. The number of programs
grew to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, seven U.S. associated Pacific islands and Puerto Rico, and eight tribes and tribal organizations. All 66 programs developed cancer plans through
their cancer coalitions and subsequently built capacity to put their plans into action. In 1998, national partners, including the
American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute, and several others, came together
and formalized the Comprehensive Cancer Control National Partnership to support CDC’s program
and these local cancer coalitions. Today, thousands of individuals work together
in cancer coalitions that focus on the cancer continuum, from reducing risk factors for
getting cancer to highlighting the needs of those who may be at the end of life. You will hear more about the program from Nikki Hayes, chief of our division’s Comprehensive Cancer Control Branch. She will share how Cancer Prevention Works. Thank you, Dr. Richardson. Today, NCCCP provides the funding, guidance,
and technical assistance used by 66 programs to plan, implement, and evaluate scientifically
proven ways to prevent and control cancer. National cancer control planning was once just
an idea among a few public health leaders. Today, the NCCCP is the gold standard for
community-based cancer prevention and control efforts. Comprehensive cancer control programs and
their coalitions work together to: Reduce people’s risks of developing cancer;
to make sure everyone gets the right cancer screening at the right time;
to help cancer survivors live longer, healthier lives; and to make sure that communities with worse cancer health outcomes have the best opportunities
for improving health. Let me share a few examples. Comprehensive cancer control programs, in
collaboration with their immunization colleagues, are successfully increasing HPV vaccination
coverage among adolescent girls and boys. This will help reduce the incidence of HPV-associated
cancers later in life. Nearly every comprehensive cancer control program has established colorectal cancer prevention as a priority. Many are working to surpass the goal of
having 80% of adults 50 and older screened for colorectal
cancer by the end of 2018. More than 30 state teams are implementing
action plans to reach the 80 by 2018 goal. These states developed their action plans while attending workshops held by CDC and partners including the National Cancer Institute, the American
Cancer Society, the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable, and the National Association of
Chronic Disease Directors. Across the country, programs are effectively
focusing on reducing skin cancer risk by providing education about exposure to ultraviolet (UV)
radiation from the sun or from indoor tanning. With our growing cancer survivor population,
programs are working to understand and meet the needs of cancer survivors, including physical
and mental health needs. They are also emphasizing the importance of
survivorship care plans to guide follow-up treatment when treatment is completed. Lastly, all 66 of our comprehensive cancer
control programs are committed to reducing cancer disparities in underserved populations,
so that all communities benefit from cancer control strategies. Today, we are leading nationwide efforts to
develop, put into action, and promote effective strategies to prevent and control cancer. Through our evaluation efforts, we have evidence
that the comprehensive cancer control approach is working. And I am pleased to report that lessons learned from the National
Comprehensive Cancer Control Program are being adapted to prevent and control cancer in other parts of the world,
including Africa. We are very proud of the achievements made
during the first 20 years of the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program, and
we look forward to its continued success for many years to come. Please visit our website at www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp
to learn more about our program, partners, and why Cancer Prevention Works. Thank you.

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