Group 10 Social Bet-Hedging in Vampire Bats

Group 10 Social Bet-Hedging in Vampire Bats


Social bet-hedging in vampire bats Vampire bats can suffer from starvation and therefore rely on others to share food, or
blood. Food sharing strengthens relationships between
kin and non-kin. Why then should organisms invest in relationships
with nonkin, if kin relationships are available and seemingly
more beneficial? In order to test this, scientists removed
key food-sharing partners from the bat community and observed the reaction to this stimulus. In biology, the definition of altruism is
when an organisms’ behavior benefits other organisms at a cost to itself. Altruistic relationships between non-kin can
aid in the survival of individuals. At times when food is scarce higher quantity
of non-kin relationships can outweigh fewer quality kin relationships. Fitness is the ability to survive and reproduce
in an environment. Bats that are considered kin are related in
genotype and phenotype, exhibiting similar behaviors that are inherited
through generations. Natural selection favors the altruistic behavior
which comes at a cost to individual bats but increases the overall fitness of the group. Evolution by natural selection is when the
environment exerts a pressure on a population so that only some phenotypes survive and reproduce
successfully. Through this process, the physical and behavioral
traits most beneficial for survival will be passed on to kin. Yo sis, come eat with me Ok bro! One year later… (We’re dead) Hey whatsup random person, come eat with me Okay! One year later… Yo sorry about your brother Partyyy Woooo Researchers found that bats who had previously fed nonkin lost less food when their key kin
donor was removed in comparison to bats who only shared with
kin. So how can altruism develop in a population
when it seemingly comes at a negative cost to an organism? Essentially, the long term benefits of having
non-kin relationships among bats greatly outweigh the initial cost of building
the relationship that is food sharing with non-kin vs not sharing food. In conclusion, it is more beneficial for bats
to make a greater quantity of nonkin relationships rather than fewer quality relationships with
kin

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