Hawaii Island Humane Society Volunteering

Hawaii Island Humane Society Volunteering


Hi everybody, my name is Luther, And I’m a volunteer with the Hawaii Island Humane Society Here at the Kona location. Right now we are standing outside our animal surgery trailer, the Spay and Neuter Waggin’. Having your pet sterilized is extremely important because overpopulation of dogs and cats is the leading cause of animal suffering on the island. At this location alone, we neuter about 200 dogs and cats each month. Now let’s go on inside and meet one of our veterinarians. So here we’re at inside the Spay and Neuter Waggin’ And we’re with Dr. Kelly, one of the veterinarians; and we’re gonna ask her some questions. So this seems like a really high-tech trailer, so what all is it able to do? Yeah, good question. We’re really fortunate, this was a great grant program that we had that allowed us to purchase the Spay and Neuter Waggin’. It has all kinds of bells and whistles. We’re pretty much a self-sustaining clinic in here. We’ll show you a couple, little, secret compartments. We’ve got a vacuum in here, always comes in handy with all the shedding and hair clipping that we do. There’s a scale under here, hiding, I guess I won’t pull it out all the way. But there’s a full size scale here with a little digital reader so we can weigh our dogs. We have a smaller scale for cats. We’ve got a sink and this whole basin underneath here can be used to bathe dogs. Can take this out and give them a bath. There are two isoflurane machines, so that’s our gas anesthesia. One here for prepping the patient and one over there for actual surgery. Tons of kennels in here. The cats get to live upstairs, which is generally less stressful for them. We can either have one large kennel or we can remove the divider and it could then become one big one or two small ones. Which is handy in this small space. Plenty of storage for surgical supplies. It’s really important to have a good surgery light, we’re very lucky to have that one. There’s a little light here that the technicians can use. They do all their clipping and prepping, they give the drugs, they administer the microchip Right here on this table. This is our surgical scrub. Dr. Kelly, what all is performed to an animal before they are ready for adoption. We try to take really good care of our animals before we send them out the door. Of course as you can see here everybody is spayed and neutered. Everybody has a microchip. So that’s a scannable identification system, that way if the dog ever comes back to us We can immediately tag it to a person’s address and phone number And try to reunite them with their owner. All of the animals are dewormed and their given heart worm preventative if they’re a dog. Vaccinated, usually at least twice. So you’re obviously an expert and an animal lover, so do you have any reservations For getting your own pets spay or neutered? I do not, I personally spayed and neutered my own pets. Absolutely it is my preference to have an animal that is “fixed” as we say. Dealing with a dog that is constantly going through heat is a lot more work than people realize. At home breeding is just not necessarily my cup of tea, not always advisable either. It’s a lot of work. And my cat, frankly he smells better and behaves better because he is neutered. So how many surgeries do you do a day, a month, a year? Good question. Thanks to my awesome team of vet techs, which we really couldn’t do without the right number of people. We’re able to do as many as thirty in one day, it kind of depends on the size and gender of all of our patients. But thirty is probably our maximum potential, we usually do more like twenty to maintain good quality of care. We do that number, about twenty, three days a week. So my number per month is usually right around 200 surgeries. That’s cats, dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs. So that puts us at somewhere between 4 and 5 thousand total for HIHS. That’s both sides of the island per year. And that includes shelter animals as well as community animals. We have a county contract that helps us with funding to do free spays and neuters For the community. We’re really proud to offer that service and we try to offer it to as many people as possible. We are limited by the number of days we can do that, but it’s completely free. We do encourage them to buy a microchip for $10. Usually we can talk people into that, It’s a responsible decision, but that’s the only cost to them and like I said it’s optional. And so anyone can just, basically, drive up and get their animal… Yeah, essentially. You’d need an appointment just like a regular vet clinic, but you can Make one through the front desk, we have quite a bit of flexibility. Thank you so much for your time, do you have any final advice for the audience and Pet owners at home? You’re welcome, it’s always a pleasure Luther. I think our main message here, especially Considering where I’m standing right now is the importance of spaying and neutering. It’s important to think of pet overpopulation as a community problem, not a humane society problem. We’re all in this together and if we encourage people to spay and neuter, Your friends, your neighbors, your family, we’re all gonna help make a difference. That’s really the only way that we can help prevent all these poor, homeless animals. We love taking care of them and they’re our patients, but the more animals that we’re able to fix Each year, the fewer end up here. Thanks Luther. Thank you so much. Behind me here is Adoption Alley, it’s where we house puppies, kittens, and adult dogs and cats. Before they are adopted all of our animals are neutered, chipped, and brought up to date on All their vaccines, then they are available for you to adopt and take home. Let’s go see who is in Adoption Alley. We have Bubba leashed up, we’re gonna take him out to the bark park. Here’s the bark park, we’re gonna go on inside, let Bubba off the leash to have some fun. I think Humane Society volunteers really make a difference in the dogs’ lives. Just by coming in to spend time with them, they love people and they just really need some attention. I think it really makes their day. Probably one of the most important things I’ve learned during my volunteering is the big problem That is animal overpopulation. The best way for you to help relieve animal suffering is to neuter your pets. In many cases the Humane Society will even do it for free. Thanks for joining me at the Kona Humane Society. Come down to any of the Humane Society locations to volunteer your time or Maybe even adopt a new friend. If you are interested in learning more about the Hawaii Island Humane Societies, Please call or visit them on the web. Thank you.

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