Honors Program: Songs and Symphonies

Honors Program: Songs and Symphonies


Jerry Young/Professor emeritus of music: So
you have listened to a little music, let’s take a couple minutes and talk about it. The
course is a course in listening. Brianna Hedeman/Sophomore biology and Spanish
major: This course especially is all about critical listening. (((natural sound of operatic
music)) Jerry Young: We do listen to Schubert and Mozart, but also, most people who are
familiar with my course know, that I consider Billy Joel to be one of the great artists
of all time. Student: Last week’s discussion really got me to thinking about why I listen
to rock and roll. Jerry Young: Many years ago one of my students came to me and said
doc, wouldn’t it be nice if we shared some of our music with each other. That had real
merit. Student in class: So, whether you’ve heard it or not before, I’m going to play
the Game of Thrones theme. Jerry Young: I mean most of what this class is actually comes
from the student. Brianna Hedeman: He really emphasizes getting to know more about the
subject than just face value. He encourages you to actively think about what you’re listening
to. Joshua String/Senior kinesiology major: it’s in a sense, a process of self discovery.
It’s a good exploration. Rick Behlmer/Senior biology major: I’m a biology major, and doc
encouraged me to read a book called The Biomedical Foundations of Music as Therapy, and I remember
one of the chapters in that book looked at music as a therapy for pain. Jerry Young:
Music can have a physical and psychological impact on patients. Joshua Stringer: You don’t
look at the surface of the subject, you don’t look at the surface of an assignment; you
always examine what more there is to do, what more there is to learn. Brianna Hedeman: Instead
of just active listening you’re actively learning about something, and that is something that
is very easy to translate into regular academics.

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