Korean companies in Indonesia contributing to society

Korean companies in Indonesia contributing to society


Indonesia. Located right in between the mainland of Southeast
Asia and Australia,… this pivotal trading hub is also the region’s biggest economy. Among foreigners devoted to business ventures
in that country are Koreans. They are not simply driven to leave their
mark, but to give something back. Cha Sang-mi files this reports from Jakarta. Indonesia boasts the largest economy in Southeast
Asia and is one of the world’s major emerging markets. And it seems that several Korean firms are
contributing to Indonesia’s economic growth and employing its people. “Sure Koreans are spread out across the world,
but Indonesia is one country they find themselves at home. Some 50-thousand Koreans live and work in
Indonesia and over 300-thousand Korean tourists visit every year.” A shoe manufacturer on the island of Java
currently employs some 40-thousand locals. And the head of the company, a Korean, sees
his company’s business there as a win-win situation. “Indonesia has the biggest population in Southeast
Asia… at some 260 million. But since they lack the industrial technology
to hire so many people, there’s also a lack of jobs.” Shin said that Indonesia’s young and abundant
workforce and relatively low wages are reasons why investors see merits in the market. “I already work in here for 12 years and I
feel confident and happy to work together with Korea, especially South Korea.” And with Korean pop culture and cuisine making
huge inroads in Indonesia, a firm that sells and distributes Korean food products has found
a way to offer the country not only highly sought-after goods, but some socially meaningful
services. “We have been sponsoring Indonesian children
suffering from cardiac diseases for the past 25 years. We are also helping people with leprosy and
those displaced by flooding. Corporate social responsibility is our family
business.” The owner expressed gratitude to Indonesia
for enabling him to expand his business and work with locals who share the same mindset,
but most importantly, he seemed to be thrilled to see the locals enjoying Korean food. “Because I really love Korean food, every
time I run out of kimchi, I come to this market to get it.” These two companies are just a small part
of the Korean business presence on the Indonesian archipelago. More than 2-thousand-500 private businesses
in a range of sectors from the garment industry to education… coexist with the locals irrespective
of language, nationality or religion. Cha Sang-mi, Arirang News, Jakarta.

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