Mammograms Key to Early Detection of Breast Cancer

Mammograms Key to Early Detection of Breast Cancer


– Tomorrow is the first day
of October and you’ll probably see a lot of pink throughout the month. That’s because it’s Breast
Cancer Awareness month. The American Cancer Society
says there will be more than 246,000 new cases of
invasive breast cancer in 2016. More than 40,000
patients will pass away. And the most effective way
to lower that number is getting a mammogram. Now today, we are talking
with Dr. Anne Kobberman to learn about screenings,
3-D mammogram symptoms, and risks. So thank you for being here. I see you have your pink on. – Yes, absolutely. – And it technically starts tomorrow. I’m sure it’s a very
busy month for you guys. – Absolutely. – But prior to that, we want
to answer people’s questions and one of those is really
what age should you start getting mammograms? – So screening should start
before you get mammograms. They should start with
breast awareness and clinical breast exams
in your 20’s and 30’s. Yearly mammograms should
start at age 40 for average risk women. For women that are elevated
risks for various family history or other reasons, sometimes
that will start earlier. But for the majority of
woman, age 40 is when we recommend starting. – [News Anchor] And
that’s super important. You’ve gotta know your
family history because it really impacts what
your prognosis could be. – [Anne] Right. So big things to pay
attention to with that is, you want to know family
history on your mom’s side and your dad’s side. But also other factors
that are not related to the family history and they
put you at increased risks. So it’s really important
that you have a conversation with your doctor to identify
if you are someone that should have enhanced screening. – [News Anchor] And the good
thing about this is that every year, you know, medicine —
technology increases and gets better. So right now, what are some of the breast imaging devises or
mammogram systems that we’re looking at that are much
different than years past? – [Anne] So the big thing
that’s relatively new is 3D mammography or tomosynthesis, although you probably hear
it as 3-D mammography. – [News Anchor] Yeah, a
little easier to say. (laughs) – [Anne] It’s a little easier to say. And that is a new technique
that actually allows us to get the same two views
that we used to get, but also some additional
reconstructive views so we can look through the
breast slice by slice, instead of trying to get the entire breast from top to bottom at once. And that allows us to
identify small masses that we wouldn’t necessarily see as soon. – [News Anchor] Aw jeez. Yeah. – And it also is really
affective in identifying things that aren’t problematic
so we don’t have to call people back for additional imaging or biopsies that are unnecessary. – Yeah. This is really
changing how you guys end up diagnosing which is great.
– Absolutely. – Speaking of that, what
are some symptoms or signs that women should look for right away? – Yeah. So there are some
things that will only be picked up by imaging, but
there are things that you can be aware of that may
indicate that there’s something going on in your breasts. So, lumps or bumps that
are new that don’t go away as you go through your menstrual cycle. New nipple discharge especially if it’s bloody, spontaneous. Changes to the breast skin;
swelling, dimpling, redness can be problematic. So really, we try to
encourage women to be aware of what their normal is. Cause some people have lumps or bumps. So then you can identify
if anything’s different and be able to bring that to the attention of your physician. – [News Anchor] So important. Everybody needs to remember that and stay on top of it. All right Doctor Kobberman. Thank you so much for being here. – Absolutely. – For more headlines
from HCA Midwest Health, go to our website: KCTV5.COM
and click on the Health link on the top of the page.

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