May 2018 Nurse Pinning Ceremony

May 2018 Nurse Pinning Ceremony



… …
… Test test test. This is a
captioning test. Test test test. [ Processional ] MARIE: Welcome: “It is with
great honor that I welcome you to the 2018 graduate nurse
pinning ceremony for the presentation of graduate nurse
pins. Tonight’s ceremony is a tradition within our
profession and symbolizes the formal acceptance of these
graduates into the nursing profession. In addition, it
indicates the completion of your nursing education and the
beginning of life-long learning.
These 21 graduates have worked long and hard to be here
tonight and we are fortunate to have all of you here to
share in their tremendous achievements.” “We will commence tonight’s
ceremony with an invocation by Sister Juliana, our College
Chaplin.” SISTER JULIANA: Student
nurses, soon-to-be-graduates. Fortitude. It may not be in your spoken vocabulary daily,
but for certain, you’ve practiced it every day of your
journey to become a nurse. It means strength, for sure, but more than in the context of the muscles you’ve studied. It is the strength of determination, of asking for
help, of being ready to take a calculated risk, and setting
valued-based priorities. My prayer of invocation is that you will have the
fortitude to become the best in your field of expertise.
Families, friends, instructors, colleagues and
the entire Jefferson Community hold you in esteem as you
receive your pin and recite your pledge this evening.
Amen. MARIE: Please allow me to
introduce the President of Jefferson Community College, Dr. Ty Stone. [ Applause ] DR. STONE: Good evening.
Distinguished guests, faculty, family, friends and students:
Welcome to Jefferson Community College’s Nurse Pinning
Pinning. Ceremony. This is such an
exciting time for these dedicated individuals and I’m
so proud to be celebrating with them. You persevered and
made it through. We all applaud you in your commitment
to finish what you started. Of course, this is not the end
of your development into the extraordinary nurses you you
will become. There is much more work ahead. But you are
well prepared with the skills and knowledge gleaned at
Jefferson, combined with your own compassion and strength.
Along with your families and friends that supported you to
this point, please also remember that you have all of
us here at Jefferson Community College cheering you on. We
will always be a part of your extended family and we are
always here for you should you need us. Go on to be great
things graduates. We salute you.
[ Applause ] MARIE: I would like to .
Introduce our special guests, professional staff and nursing
faculty that are joining us this even. You just heard
from Dr. TY stone, our college President. [ Applause ]
We also have with us this evening,
Tom Finch, Vice President for Academic Affairs .
[ Applause ] Dan, Vice President for
science. [ Applause ]
Linda Dittrick, Associate Vice President for Math/Science,
Technology, and Health Health.
[ Applause ] Dr. Katy Troester-Trate,
Interim Dean of Students Students.
[ Applause ] And you met V. Giuliana, our
college Chaplin. [ Applause ]
>>I would like to introduce the faculty.
Julie Soule, Director of our Weekend Program Program.
[ Applause ] Jodi Pierce.
Your Keynote Speaker this evening.
[ Applause ] Cassondra Widrick-Phillips .
[ Applause ] Dr. Morgan Krump, our
laboratory coordinator coordinator.
[ Applause ] Kady Hoistion .
[ Applause ] Kim Honeywell .
[ Applause ] We also have a tremendous
adjunct faculty that helps us a great deal. Aaron Erin Phinney Phinney.
[ Applause ] Shannon Phillips .
[ Applause ] Katie O’Brien.
[ Applause ] Dr. Deborah Marcel.
[ Applause ] And also with us this evening
is Julie Roy. [ Applause ] A special thank you to each of
you for all you do to support our nursing program and
students. I would like to invite Kristin Farmer to the podium
to introduce our Keynote speaker, Jodi Pierce. Applause applause KRISTIN FARMER: Good evening
everyone. I’d like to start off by saying thank you so
much for joining us on very special night. I know these
past two years have been quite long for most of you out there
there. Tonight I have the honor of introduceing to you
our Keynote Speaker. She is just one of our many inspire
ing nursing instructors here at JC
JCC who welcomed us two years ago,
and has watched us grow into promising nurses . I’m honored
to introduce to you all Johanna Pierce, or as we have
always known her as, “Jodi.” let me just tell you a little
bit about her. Jodi received a Bachelor’s of
Science and a Master’s of Science in Nursing Education
from Le Moyne College in Syracuse, New York. She has
been a staff member and nurse, involved in direct patient
care for most of her professional career and has
worked in a variety of areas including: intensive care
units, medical-surgical units, operating and procedural rooms
and in interventional radiology.
Her passion is, and always has been cardiothoracic critical care nursing. If there is
anything we have learned from Jodi; it’s how much she loves As a nurse educator and
preceptor for new nurses in these areas, she discovered
her love for teaching and training a new generation of
nurses. While working full-time, she also taught
nursing part-time here at Jefferson, and in 2012,
accepted a full-time teaching position in which she
continues to inspire all of her students in the classroom
and in the clinical setting. Jodi is a member of the
Central Professional Nurses Association and the American
Association for Critical Care Nurses (AACN), National League
for Nurses, the American Nurses Association, and is
also a member of the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma
Theta Tau International Jodi currently resides in
Watertown, with her beloved pets. Like nursing, she has
always had a deep and life-long love for animals and
hopes one day to work at an animal rescue sanctuary. We’ve
enjoyed her many stories about her beagles, cats and birds.
She also enjoys reading, teaching, and spending time
with her family and friends in Georgia, and I’ve never met anyone who loves airplanes as much as her or marshmallow
peeps for that matter. I would also like to say this
evening that, not only has Jodi, aided in making our
dreams of becoming a nurse a reality over these past two
years, the real masterminds behind our success, I’m proud
to say, Is our entire JCC nursing faculty. After
spending more time with peers, clinical, lab and lecture
instructors than our own families and friends, I’ve proudly learned that behind
every great nursing student, is a patient, motivating, and
encouraging nursing instructor. The faculty here
challenged us, prayed for us, and stressed out over our
grades probably more than we ever did. They taught us
values that go far beyond NCLEX strategies and the
nursing process. You are the nurses that we aspire to be like. You are the nurses who
have raised us to be successful. Thank you for
holding us to the highest standards of excellence to
make sure we reach our full potential as care givers. You
will all always hold a special place in our hearts forever. To all of my classmates, always remember . when in
doubt, follow the patho! Thank you.
[ Applause ] JODI PIERCE: Good Evening,
family, friends, faculty, and and.
Honored guests and graduate nurses. I’m honored to be
asked by the graduateing class to be their speaker tonight
and I share this honor with all of the faculty and nursing
staff here at JCC. You have touched our lives just as much
as we have touched yours. I cannot think of any better way
to end this semester than to tell each of you, how proud I
am and how proud we all are to have been a part of your
nursing journey. For the families of our graduates, I
want to say a special thank you for
supporting and encouraging them through these last 2
years. It has been a journey for you;
as well as for them. I know it’s not been an easy
journey because I have been there. You have gone through
a professional and academic journey, one that can only be
successfully navigateed through
hard work, diligence and determination The nursing curriculum is a
very intense and complex curriculum.
Yet, through thick and thin and throughout its joy and the
channels, you persevered!
Two years of hard work and sacrifice are at an end and “A
new journey is beginning for you; build on what you have
already accomplished. Nursing is a golden key to
opportunities locally and globally. Be flexible. Take
advantage of all this great profession has to offer you.
It’s vast and ever evolving. Having said this I like to
give you a little history about the pinning ceremony
being held tonight. This rite of passage can be
traced all the way back to the Crusades of the 12th century.
When the Knight Hospitallers were honored with a Maltese
pin for caring for injured soldiers; back to 1860 when
Florence Nightingale was honored with the Red Cross pin
in recognition for her tireless service to the
injured during the Crimean War, and back to 1880; when a
class of nurses at the Bellevue Hospital School of
Nursing in New York were the first to be pinned on
graduation. So now, class of 2018, this is
your pinning ceremony and your time to join this most honored
profession. It is an occasion to honor you
also, for the successful completion of the first and
major part of your education as professional nurses.And I
know you’re all going to go on.
Every time you wear the pin, you remember the faculty, the
staff and your colleagues of the Jefferson Community
College nursing program that were part of your journey and
your professional life story. Your nursing pin reminds you
that, from now on, your purpose is three fold; to
care, to advocate, and to lead. In other words, you are now a
care provider and an advocate for your patients, and a
leader in any setting you might find yourself.
Now, when you care for your patients, do so with
diligence, professionalism, empathy, and humility.
Attend to them with respect, compassion, and without being
judgmental. Listen and remember that many
times you will need to listen more than you need to talk. You will be surprised that you
can learn from your patients; as much as they from you; if
you truly listen. And what you learn from them
may be the very knowledge you need to provide the best care
for them and for others in similar situations.
Remember, trust and honesty will nurture your relationship
with your patients and their loved ones. It is a bond that
will see them and yourself through times of joy and times
of sorrow. Be wholly aware that you are
entering a profession that has ranked first, among all
professions for honesty and ethics for the past 16 years
in a row. According to the Gallup poll,
82 percent of Americans rated nurses’ honesty and ethical
standards as “very high” or “high.”
The next closest profession, were pharmacist rated 20
percentage points behind nursing. So, class of 2018, as you care
for your patients, always remember that your patients
and their loved ones are counting on your integrity and
your honesty to care for them. I would like to conclude
tonight by sharing an inspirational quote that has
stuck with me, and one I feel is completely appropriate to
send you off into the world of nursing.
Think deeply, speak gently, love much, laugh a lot, work hard, give freely, and above
all else be kind. I want tow congratulate and
you thank you for a great two years. So congratulations and
have a wonderful night! [ Applause ] Marie: We’d like to present a
few awards to our students. The first is the
Debra Marsala Excellence in Nursing Award.we are fortunate
to have Deb with us this evening.
The Dr. Debra R. Marsala Excellence in Nursing Award
was established to recognize a graduating senior student who
demonstrates dedication and passion for the profession of
nursing. Dr. Debra Rose Marsala was a
graduate of the JCC Nursing program, Class of ’77.
She returned to her alma mater as a member of the JCC nursing
faculty in 1985 and was Nursing Department Chair for
12 years. Under her leadership, this
program has gained a reputation for maintaining
high standards and preparing outstanding nurses for the
community. Dr. Marsala was also named Professor Nursing Emeritus in
recognition of her commendable service. She is the first
member of the Nursing Department to be awarded this
honor. This award is given to a graduate nurse who rises to
the standards of excellence demonstrated by Outstanding class and clinical
preparation; Compassionate and creative
patient care; Exceptional communication
skills; Support of student colleagues; Unfailing advocacy of patient
and family. This year, we are pleased to
award the Dr. Debra Marsala Excellence in Nursing Award
to: Curstyn Lerew Lerew.
[ Applause ] Our next award is from
Diedra Sorrel, Director of Nursing, at Samaritan Medical Center, will be presenting the
Samaritan Medical Center HEART Award. [ Applause ] Deidre: Wendy and I are happy
and honored to present this award and both of us have sat
in those seats. My experience was 24 years ago and Dr.
Dr. Marsala here as well. So we will survive is what I’m
here to tell you and maybe stand on the stage some day
and proudly present this award award. Several years ago, as
a nursing division, decideed we
really needed a theory to guide us. So we decideed that
we studied with others. Gene
really stands behind the practice that we commit to
creating valueing excellence in
patient care and services and through this guideing — us,
we developed many programs.
Samaritan excellence, Samaritan spirit and many of
you certainly all of you have been there. We see face that
is we have seen every day. You can see that through the
years, we have used this guide guiding practice as a way to
make our experience better, our patient experience better.
The heart value, this is what this award is, stands for
honesty, empathy, accountability, respect and
trust. And you heard that in every speech tonight. This
caring theory guides us and fulfills these values.
Tonight, Wendy will explain to you what this award is about.
>>The student chosen by the faculty by this award clearly
and consistently demonstrates the caring characteristics of
the heart values. That care ing
is more than providing physical and assigned tasks.
Caring is integral part of everything the nurse does and
that this is the intention of a nurse. When a caring and
hear hearing environment is the
foundation of exceptional nursing care, that listening
to what the patient and family desires in addition to what
they need, finds meaning in what he or she does. The
nursing award for 2018 goes to Sara Rillera. [ Applause ] >>If anybody knows me, I love
to take a microphone. So before I give this away, I
just want to say one thing as nursing leaders and I hope
that it resonates with you and it’s just something to think
about. Take responsibility for the energy you bring to
work every day. It’s important to your parents.
It’s important to your colleagues. It will make all
the difference in your career. Thanks.
[ Applause ] >>Marie: Our next award is
the star award in memory of Dr. Walter Atkinson. This
award was established by the Kennedy family and many years
ago, Muriel Kennedy prepared the following words to be
shared at the presentation of the STAR
AWARD. A very wise person once made
this remark. “My purpose in life is to make it possible
for every living person to develop his or her own
potentialities in the greatest measure, and to live
creatively according to his or her own achievements.” Dr. Walter Atkinson practiced
— Pam come, on up. This is Pam Kennedy who was going to
give the award. [ Laughs ]
Ladies and gentlemen, Mrs. Mrs. Pam Kennedy. Applause
applause.>>I cannot believe this . I’m
so embarrassed. I mean, really. I’m looking out there
going, where is everybody?. There it is. Okay. I’m glad
my in laws are not here. [ Laughs ]
Okay . We are going to start
from the beginning. You lucky people. In past years, Dr.
Dr. John and Muriel Kennedy continued the star award
tradition started by Dr. Dr. Walter Atkinson in 1944.
Both gentleman practiced opthalmology in Watertown New
New York and tonight I’m very happy, a little late but I’m
happy to continue the tradition by reading a speech
written by my mother-in-law ,
Muriel. A very wise person once made
this remark. “My purpose in life is to make it possible for every living person to
develop his or her own potentialities in the greatest
measure, and to live creatively according to his or
her own achievements.” Dr. Walter Atkinson practiced
that philosophy all of his life. He did all that he
could to encourage everyone whose life he touched, to do
his or her very best, always. In the early days of the
nursing school at the House of the Good Samaritan, he
established the STAR AWARD to reward that excellence of achievement. It carried a
monetary value, but more importantly, it gave to the
person who earned it, a STAR to wear attached to the
nursing pin, so that all the world would know that this
person had developed, at this time, his or her
potentialities to the highest level. When Jefferson Community
College started its nursing program, Dr. John and Muriel
Kennedy wanted to carry on that tradition in honor of Dr. Atkinson. They established a
similar award here at the Community College. At that time, Dr. Atkinson was
still alive and attended several of those first JCC
pinning ceremonies with the Kennedys. Tonight, I present the STAR
AWARD in Memory of Dr. Walter Atkinson and Dr. John and
Muriel Kennedy to Amanda Collins. [ Applause ] Congratulations. Thank you!
>>I would like to invite Kady to the podium to present the mercy hospital
school of nursing alumni award award. [ Applause ]
KADY HOISTION: Mercy Hospital Alumnae Award was established
to honor a graduating senior who exemplifies the tradition
of the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing.
This tradition is based on the mission of Catherine Macaulay,
Founder of the Sisters of Mercy, to care for the sick
and the poor. The School of Nursing, which
closed in 1970, embodied the values of the Sisters of Mercy of excellence, caring, and
service to the sick. It is these values that we recognize
tonight. I am honored to be here
tonight to present this award on behalf of the Mercy
Hospital Alumnae to this most deserving graduate.
This year’s recipient of the Mercy Hospital School of
Nursing Alumni Award is Trisha Ackerman. [ Applause ] The next award is the
Marion Brennan Personal Growth of Nursing Awards.we are
grateful to the family for their continued support of
our program. I’d like to invite
Cassondra Widrick-Phillips to podium to present these awards
awards. [ Applause ] CASSONDRA PHILLIPS: The
Marion Brennan Personal Growth in Nursing Award was
established in 2003 to recognize a graduating student
who has demonstrated outstanding growth in
character, personal development, and skills while
pursuing a nursing degree at Jefferson Community College. The award is given in honor of Marion Willy Moody Brennan, a
1973 graduate of Jefferson’s nursing program. Mrs. Brennan earned her degree at the age
of 53, after raising nine children. As a registered
nurse, Mrs. Brennan worked at Carthage Area Hospital until
her retirement from the position of head nurse in the
maternity department, where she also served as a Lamaze
instructor. Mrs. Brennan believed that one
should value each person’s worth, treating everyone with
respect and inspiring each to do their best. Education is
all a person lacks to become the best they can be. Mrs. Brennan passed away on
January 2, 2003. She would certainly be pleased to know
that in her memory, a nurse’s achievement will be
recognized. The Jefferson Community
College Nursing Department and the Jefferson Community
College Foundation are grateful to the family of
Marion Brennan for establishing this award in
memory of this outstanding nurse.
This year’s recipients of the Marion Brennan Personal Growth in Nursing Award are Kathleen
Greene and Cody Fields. [ Applause ] MARIE: I would now like to
introduce Matthew Barrington who will present the class reflections. [ Applause ] MATTHEW BARRINGTON: First and
foremost, congratulations to the JCC Class of 2018! [ Applause ] While we have worked hard and
diligently to be here on this night, we would like to
recognize that it is our family and our network of
friends in this room tonight that have provided us with the
love, support, and encouragement that has
sustained us throughout our educational journey these last
two years. We humbly, sincerely, and with
utmost gratitude thank you all, on this day. [ Applause ] As our family and friends
know, over the last two years, our lives have run the gamut of emotions. Together we have laughed, we have cried, we
have been worried and fearful at times, but ultimately we
have felt tremendous joy and happiness, looking into the
future. Together we have persisted and together we have
endured. We share our achievement, together, with
you here tonight. For those of you who were
unable to witness our journey firsthand, we would like to
offer you an insight to our lives as nursing students. So it all began With a letter in the mail that
we all screeched at that read, “Congratulations, you’ve been accepted into the Nursing
Program”, with a slight caveat- “Contingent on
completion of a medication calculation examination with a score of 100%”. Before class
even started, we had an exam. Welcome to Nursing school. [ Laughs ]
We picked up our required reading for from the bookstore
which included no less than 23 books, several of which were
2000 pages in length, all together, weighing more than
some of our small children. [ Laughs ]
We wondered how we could ever read that many pages. We
checked our course manual to see our assignment for the
first class- read 18 chapters. Welcome to Nursing school. [ Laughs ]
We picked up our new uniforms and tried them on proudly,
despite the pleated men’s shirts that we were pretty sure were women’s. And of
course there was finding a pair of absolutely 100% white
shoes, with no other colors, stripes, or emblems on them-
even on the bottom. [ Laughs ]
Before the semester began, we walked into our Jump Start Orientation as strangers. We
were told in this pep talk and reality check with Lisa and Marlene, both congratulations and that we may be entering
the most difficult two years of our lives. Even those who
served in the armed forces later came to think that
perhaps this wasn’t a bluff. [ Laughs ]
They told us that we may have to miss out on some things in
our lives, but to hang in there and all of our hard work
would be worth it in the end. This was our new mantra. So we began with the
fundamentals in 111 with Kim, Kim,.
With her scooter — oops!
who at the last minute took on teaching the entire semester
of course material instead of co-teaching as was planned. We
read and studied those hundreds of pages from our
books, went to our first clinicals, and experienced our
first critical elements, where I think we all personally
experienced heart palpitations long before we would learn
about them. [ Laughs ]
We learned about bed baths- and beyond. [ Laughs ]
We had concept map workshops. We learned in length about the
Nursing process (Assessment, Diagnosis, Planning,
Intervention, and Evaluation- Wash, Rinse, and Repeat) and and.
Nursing diagnosis. Before long we were diagnosing
ourselves. For example: Anxiety related to critical
elements, exams, BTIs as evidenced by students shaking,
crying. Fatigue related to clinical preparation as evidenced by bags under eyes,
sluggishness, yawning and Imbalanced Nutrition: More
Than Body Requirements related to stress eating as evidenced by weight gain. You’ve heard
about the freshman fifteen? Try the nursing school ninety. [ Laughs ] Last, we inadvertently learned
about Nursing Student Syndrome, wherein students
believe they have the ailments which they are studying.
Stefanie had the most severe case throughout the program,
and in the first semester, she was sure she had a brain tumor- an MRI revealed,
thankfully she did not. [ Laughs ]
Those of us who moved on to our second semester felt
optimistic and proud to be forging ahead on our journey.
We felt we had a grasp of how things were going to go. We
were mistaken. [ Laughs ]
We got our first real true patient assignment in 112 and
nobody knew exactly what that really entailed. As we
stumbled in to pre conference at 6:30 in the morning, narrow-eyed and not so bushy
tailed, we compared the time we went to bed the before. “Two am”, said one. “3 am”, says another. And there was one in each group, Cody,
clutching a cup of coffee, who said, “I haven’t been to bed yet”. [ Laughs ]
We got better at preparing for clinical and learned patient
assessment, IV therapy, pre and post-op care,
musculoskeletal and neurovascular assessment, and
immobility and cast care. While on the orthopedic floor,
Stephanie misdiagnosed herself this time with a bone tumor. [ Laughs ]
We progressed from five nursing diagnoses to fifteen,
and actually felt like we were getting somewhere. Until…maternity. [ Laughs ]
In maternity with Cassondra, we observed the beginning of
life, with newborns literally taking their very first
breath. She taught us the in’s and out’s of our in’s and
out’s. It didn’t take long for Stephenie to diagnose herself
with cervical cancer- another false alarm. [ Laughs ]
Our emotions were tested as we watched new mothers and
fathers hold their babies for the very first time. And when
we provided care to neonates who were desperately ill and
depended on nurses to survive. On a lighter note, in class we
learned how to meditate, how to give a therapeutic massage,
the proper way to breathe in the flowers and blow out the candles.
[ Laughs ] Don’t forget Veal Chop, and of
course, when in doubt, we will always massage the fundus. [ Laughs ]
We all knew the third semester would be the toughest semester
we would face. We would spend countless hours crammed in the
library study rooms and make lifelong friendships with many
of the delivery drivers from Cam’s pizza. [ Laughs ]
Psych required a whole different set of skills and
confronted us with many new challenges. There was this
new concept of therapeutic communication and process recording. Kady led us to
discover these psychosocial tools, as well as a myriad of
psychobiological disorders, and trauma interventions,
often through an exercise of role play. Our twelve-hour
clinicals gave Stephanie the time to diagnose herself with
a personality disorder, and for the rest of us to be
involved in leading group therapy and assisting with
recovery, not to mention playing Apples to Apples and
eating therapeutic graham crackers. And peanut butter.
[ Laughs ] In 231 MedSurg, Julie and Jodi
taught us the realities of becoming a nurse. We tested on
IV push medications, where we learned that Protonix, an
anti-ulcer medication, would for us, ironically, have the opposite effect. [ Laughs ]
We also studied diabetic medications, blood
transfusions, fresh frozen plasma, and gastrointestinal
therapies. As for Stepfanie, this time it was hypothyroidism. [ Laughs ]
Jodi would teach us how to be like The Predator when
entering a patient’s room, and remind us that sometimes
that’s the way the ball bounces, never to call a doctor with egg on our face, and for the love of everything
holy- to follow the patho. [ Laughs ]
From here on, many of us in a difficult situation would ask ourselves- WWJD- What Would
Jodi Do? [ Laughs ]
In addition to Psych and Med/Surg, we also had a
pharmacology class thrown in the mix. We learned with Julie Roy from her worksheets to her case studies, what seemed like
every medication known to man. We learned ‘basic’ clinical
pharmacology for drugs across the lifespan, including
neuropharmacology, muscarinic agonists and antagonists,
cholinesterase inhibitors, adrenergic agonists and
antagonists, CNS drugs for neurodegenerative disorders,
local and general anesthetics, opioid analgesics, opioid
antagonists, non-opioid centrally acting analgesics,
antipsychotic agents, antidepressants, sedative
hypnotics, central nervous system stimulants, diuretics,
calcium channel blockers, vasodilators, antihypertensive
meds, heart failure meds, antidysrhythmic drugs,
anticoagulant, antiplatelet, and thrombotic drugs
And that was just for the first test. Or at least that’s
how it felt to us. Thank you for holding us to a high
standard. [ Laughs ]
Our fourth and final semester, feeling so close, yet still so far- competence and confidence
began to prevail and we all started to feel like nurses.
We could see the light at the end of the tunnel, but we were still cautious that it could be an oncoming train.
[ Laughs ] We were starting to be amazed
at just how much we had learned since we started
Stephanie diagnosed herself this time with vitamin D
deficiency, and I’m proud to say, that this time, ladies
and gentlemen, she was right! [ Applause ] We experienced our pediatric
rotation at SUNY Upstate. We were driven to Syracuse by
Erin and Desiree before dawn in our white JCC chariot with
non-functioning windshield wipers to boot. If you forgot forgot.
Your government issued picture ID, Tim’s dad might be your
only hope. We. [ Laughs ]
We each all had a special
pediatric client that pulled at our heartstrings and
challenged our strength. After this rotation we
continued to take on more critically ill patients and
were able to experience nursing in settings outside
the hospital. We were fortunate to have Dr. Deb
Marsala come back to teach our Seminar course, where we gained insight into transiting
from students to the workforce. We will remember
that it was you who took us to Albany to lobby our state
representatives to vote in line with the New York State Nurses Association in favor of
the safe staffing bill because safe staffing saves patient lives. In our last round of Med/Surg 232, a 10 credit class, we
learned about the artistic talents of Dr. Marie Hess. [ Laughs ]
We can now draw a nephron tubule better than anyone. We
know that although all the answers to a question may be
correct, we must pick the bestest- and prioritize the
patient who is more worser. [ Laughs ]
She taught us about “feelings”, how to avoid poor
spells, and that you never want to end up D-E-D dead. We We.
We remember in heart block, the add D node says no! We appreciate her willingness
to take our class under her wing and teach us in a time of
uncertainty. Moreover, we are so very grateful that you
continued on as the interim department chair, working tirelessly for this program
and always putting students’ needs first. We don’t know
what we would have done without you. As the weeks rolled on, our
instructors became mentors, and our classmates became our
family. We all came from different
backgrounds and walks of life with the hopes and dreams of becoming nurses. We lost some half, of our closest friends
along the way, which felt like losing part of our family at
times. No matter what was going on in our personal
lives, we continued to follow the path of becoming a nurse.
Many times this path was lit by our instructors, and
although we may not have said it at the time, from the
bottom of our hearts- excuse me- from the apex of our
myocardium- we thank you. [ Laughs ] Your abilities to demand critical thinking, Julie, and
challenges has transformed our clinical knowledge and skills.
We are sincerely grateful to have had all of you as our
teachers and mentors- for your assistance, support,
knowledge, and expertise, but most of all, for your belief
in all of us. We’re talking about you
Desiree Fuller, Erin Phinney, Jen Castle, Samantha Coalter,
Fern Corp, Katie Eveleigh, Kady Hoistion, Kim Honeywell,
Morgan Krump, Jodi Pierce, Julie Soule, Cassondra
Widrick-Phillips, Heather Barben, Dr. Marsala, and Dr.
Hess- From all of us, to all of you-
thank you. [ Applause ] Tonight marks the end of a
journey and the beginning of a new one. Wherever life takes the flagship class of 2018 and whatever we may do, we will always hold within us these formative times, when we
walked together; where you turned us all into nurses.
Thank you. [ Cheers and Applause ] Marie: Thank you Matthew.
Thank you very much. We will now enjoy a is
slide presentation by the Graduating Nursing Class of
2018 . [ Slide presentation ] I thought you said all you
did was work hard! MARIE: We will now begin the
presentation of graduate nurse pins for the Graduating
Nursing Class of 2018. Will Erin Phinneyplease come
forward and the clinical group, please step to
the stage. Victoria Ciarfella Ciarfella.
[ Applause ] Eva Fox .
[ Applause ] Stephanie Green .
[ Applause ] Lorelei Henson .
[ Applause ] Sandra Hook .
[ Applause ] Sarah.
[ Applause ] Chelsea Shumer .
[ Applause ] Will Wednesday’s clinical
group please in forward. Amanda Collins. [ Applause ] Megan Hill .
[ Applause ] Marianna Larose .
[ Applause ] Curstyn Lerew .
[ Applause ] Abigail Widrick da Silva .
[ Applause ] Desiree Fuller will you please
come forward? And will your clinical group
please come to the stage?. Trisha Ackerman Ackerman.
[ Applause ] Matthew Barrington .
[ Applause ] Kristin Farmer .
[ Applause ] Cody Fields .
[ Applause ] Kathleen Greene .
[ Applause ] Chelsey Hale .
[ Applause ] Ryan Hinkley .
[ Applause ] Timothy Kenealy .
[ Applause ] Stefanie Timmerson .
[ Applause ] MARIE: I now present to you,
the graduate nurses of Jefferson’s Class of 2018 2018.
[ Applause ] Tonight we unite as nurses
with one common goal; to enhance physical and
psychosocial health. We dedicate ourselves to walk
beside others as they experience all aspects of
life; from birth to death. We promote wellness and show
compassion in illness. We assist and respect others as
they make choices about healthcare. We dedicate
ourselves to promote the well-being of individuals,
families, and communities. Realizing that this is a
combined effort, we pledge cooperation with other
healthcare professionals. Our goal is to give the best possible nursing care to all,
in an effort to achieve optimum physical and
psychosocial health. [ Cheers and Applause ] MARIE: Sister Juliana will
now give this evening’s Benediction. SISTER JULIANA: Nurses, much
has been entrusted to you and—fortitude, it’s there!
Thank you for sharing your words and pictures of gratitude at the opening of
tonight’s ceremony and for your heartfelt expressions to
your instructors, mentors, and guides. Carry the words of
your commitment in all you say and do. May you know God’s
blessing, always! Amen. [ Applause ] MARIE: Please remain seated
until the graduate nurses have exited the theater. Please
join us for refreshments in the commons. [ Recessional ]

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