#PreteenVaxScene Webinar #14: Back-to-School Showcase: Resources to Help You Become an HPV Champion

#PreteenVaxScene Webinar #14: Back-to-School Showcase: Resources to Help You Become an HPV Champion


CATHERINE MARTIN: Good day,
and thank you for joining us. As a participant on
today’s webinar, are you are part of a larger
audience, and all attendees are in a listen only mode. If you need
technical assistance, please use the chat box
in the lower left hand corner of your screen
to communicate with us, and we’ll do our
best to assist you. During the webinar you’ll
be invited to ask questions, and you can do so by typing
them in the box on the left hand corner of your screen. Questions will be answered at
the end of the presentation. Now I’d like to turn
this program over to your host and
moderator, Mr. Tom Schafer. TOM SCHAFER: Thanks, Catherine. Welcome to the CDC’s Adolescent
Immunization webinar series. I am Tom Schafer with the
National Public Health Information Coalition, and
I will be your host today. Joining me is Catherine
Martin, the executive director of the California
immunization coalition, who will assist with the Q&A
after today’s presentation, as well as provide an update
on the National Immunization Awareness Month toolkit. Today’s webinar, Back to
School Showcase: Resources to Help You Become
An HPV Champion, is the latest in a series we
coordinate through the Virtual Immunization
Communication Network, or VIC Network, to provide
the tools and resources you need to communicate
about the importance of immunizations. The VIC network is made up of
more than 3,000 public health communicators, health educators,
immunization coalition members, doctors, nurses, and
others interested in doing a better job of explaining
why immunizations matter. Now summer is typically
the unofficial start of the vaccination season. The period of a year when school
aged children are receiving the vaccines they need before
they start school in the fall. Presenters will discuss upcoming
HPV vaccination campaigns and resources, to help health
care professionals take advantage of the back
to school time frame to boost HPV vaccination rates. In addition to the
HPV discussions, Catherine Martin will
focus on preparations for National Immunization
Awareness Month, which takes place every August, and
offers the ideal opportunity for educators,
communicators, and advocates to work together in
promoting the importance of immunizations. A NIAM toolkit is
developed by CDC and NPHIC, contains resources, including
important facts, sample articles and news releases,
Facebook posts, and tweets you can use in August
and throughout the year. Now before we begin,
there are just a few house keeping items
I want to run through. As a reminder, there
is no dial in number associated with this webinar. Please make sure your
speakers are connected. All participant lines are muted. This webinar is being
recorded, and will be available online after the broadcast,
as will the slides. During the webinar
you may ask questions by typing them into
the question panel at the lower left hand
corner of your screen. Selected questions will be
read aloud for the presenters at the end of the presentation. Now it is my pleasure to
introduce our presenters. First is Ian Branam. He is a health
communications specialist in the National Center for
Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention. Ian has been supporting health
communication activities in NCIRD since
2014, and currently leads activities for
CDC’s HPV Vaccine as Cancer Prevention campaign. Ian has also supported NCIRD’s
public affairs portfolio, including supporting the media
response during the 2017-18 flu season. He earned his Masters
in journalism and mass communication from the
University of Georgia. Secondly will be
Jennifer Sienko, who leads the national
HPV Vaccination Roundtable work on HPV vaccine
communication and public engagement
through social media, and manages the digital
footprint of both the HPV Roundtable and the newly formed
HPV Cancer Free Family Facebook group. Prior to her work with
the HPV roundtable, Jennifer was a special assistant
to the president’s cancer panel, where she helped
research, write, and publish several reports, including
“Accelerating HPV Vaccine Uptake Urgency for Action
to Prevent Cancer.” She recently received her MPH
from the George Washington University. And finally, Catherine Martin
is the Executive Director for the California
Immunization Coalition, and works in partnership with
coalitions and organizations that support their mission
of ensuring that everyone has access to lifesaving vaccines. In addition to her
efforts in California, Catherine works with
partners around the country to support coalition
development, and to create
effective advocacy– can’t get that word out– and education campaigns. Each year she has worked
with NPHIC and others to help put together and
promote the NIAM toolkit. Now before we get
started, and I hand this over to our presenters, we
would like to take a quick poll. The question, is does
your office routinely recommend HPV
vaccination to parents as part of the preteen
health screening? And you see the five
different responses that you can give there. Please just make your
selection and hit submit. And we’ll see what we’ve got. Great, thanks for
answering those. It looks like we’ve
got a good group here. The majority– were up about
70% take every opportunity to do that. So that’s good to know. So now I’d like to
turn it over to Ian. Ian, you’re up. IAN BRANAM: Great. Thank you for that introduction. I’m excited to have
the opportunity to talk with you about
our HPV campaign, as well as launch the 2018 HPV
Vaccine as Cancer Prevention Champions Award. So to start I wanted to provide
a little bit of background on HPV campaign, and
some of the research that’s informed our efforts. The campaign has existed
since the first HPV vaccine was licensed in 2006. And throughout the campaign, the
key audiences we have targeted have been parents of
preteens, and clinicians. Two of the messages that have
been central to the campaign include emphasizing
the important role HPV vaccination plays
in preventing cancers, and stressing the
importance of vaccination at the recommended
ages of 11 to 12. Over the past several
years, the campaign has really focused
on helping clinicians learn how to make an effective
and bundled recommendation, as well as addressing parents
questions and concerns about HPV vaccination. To provide an overview of
some of the key findings of our research with
parents, we know that parents are generally
confident in HPV vaccine, including the importance and
benefits of HPV vaccination. However, parents
do have questions about safety, which can
range from questions about the pain, side effects,
or duration of protection. Parents may also have
questions about how vaccination impacts future fertility. It’s important to
note that questions don’t mean a lack of
confidence in HPV vaccination. The main barrier seems
to be on time vaccination at the ages of 11 to 12. We’ve seen that some
patients and providers want to delay vaccination
until the child is older. We also know that the main
facilitator of HPV vaccination is the provider
recommendation, which is the number one reason
parents decide to get the vaccine for their child. And now I want to
talk about some of the lessons learned from
our research providers. One lesson learned is that while
parents value HPV vaccine just as much as other
adolescent vaccines, providers perceive that
parents value the vaccine less than other adolescent vaccines. Which can influence
how they talk about the vaccine with parents. Additionally,
overall pediatricians reported that they felt
confident they could address specific parents
questions and concerns before the 13th birthday. And again, we’ve seen
on-time vaccination at 11-12 as a barrier among providers. A majority of providers say
that they routinely recommend it at 11 to 12, but the top reason
for not routinely recommending at 11 to 12 was that they
anticipated parental refusal or hesitancy. We’ve also seen that
there’s a lack of awareness on the part of some providers
about the benefits of HPV vaccination, beyond the
prevention of cervical cancer and genital warts. And, in other
words, they may not be thinking of the full scope
of cancers and precancers that HPV can cause. And again, we found
that parents trust and listened to their providers
and their recommendation is key to making parents feel
comfortable in their decision to vaccinate. Now with that, I’d like to
segue into the revamped campaign that we launched earlier this
year, that I’ll be discussing today, which really
hones in on four key segments of physicians. We conducted an online
message testing survey with pediatricians, and we found
that most physicians, about 71%, fell into at least
one of the four segments that we had identified
as benefiting from tailored messaging. The new ads launched
in April of this year, and they’ll be running
through the end of summer to take advantage of that
back to school time frame. And on the next slide they’ll
provide some more information on those segments,
and the materials tailored for each
of those segments. On this slide, you
can see a preview of the ads for our new campaign. I’ll go through
each of the segments in a little more detail
on the following slides. But you can see that there are
different messages targeted to each segment. So in the first ad
is the clinicians who think the HPV
vaccination is important, but they’re doing fine
with their coverage rates. And the second ad, this is
targeting the clinicians who think that
HPV vaccination is important for their
patients who are at high risk for HPV infection,
but not for everyone. In the third out
on the bottom left, this is targeting clinicians
who don’t think the HPV vaccine issue is important for
their adolescent patients, because there is cervical
cancer screening. And then in the fourth
ad on the bottom right, this is targeting
the clinicians who don’t think the vaccine
is important enough to really push to parents. And with that I’ll move on
to talk about these segments in a little bit more detail. And some of the
materials that are available that are targeted
to each of these segments. So the first one
that I mentioned, clinicians who think that
HPV vaccination is important, but we’re doing
fine with coverage. We know that clinicians often
compare their practice HPV vaccination rates to those
of the state, or the nation. And therefore think
that because, they’re doing better than their
state or national average, that they’re doing
all that they can. And they may not be comparing
their HPV vaccination rates to the rates of other adolescent
vaccines that are routinely recommended, such as the DTAP
and meningococcal vaccines. So this light, some clinicians
believe that they are doing all that they can to improve rates. They may not realize other
clinicians have achieved high vaccination rates, because
they’ve been able to implement changes in their practice. So we developed a fact sheet
and web page on the top 10 tips for HPV vaccination
success, which offers 10 practical and
proven tips that providers can implement in their practice
to improve their rates. And moving on to the second
segment that I mentioned. We’ve also found that
some clinicians recommend the vaccine for
patients they deem to be at high risk for HPV,
rather than recommending the Vaccine routinely for
all their 11 to 12 year old patients. We recently worked with
practicing physicians to develop a new CME activity,
titled HPV vaccination at 11 to 12 as a standard of care. And this CME features
a panel discussion of four pediatricians talking
about how they routinely recommend HPV vaccine
for all their preteen patients, including
how they make an effective bundled
recommendation, answer parents questions,
and handle parental refusal in their practice. The third segment
that I mentioned, the not important because
we have screening. Because HPV cancers are not
an immediate problem that would present itself
in adolescents, research shows that some
pediatricians may not see it as relevant
to their practice. So to address this, we
developed an infographic designed to highlight the
true burden of cancers that HPV causes,
and really reinforce the importance of vaccination to
prevent cancers in the future. So using the analogy
of an iceberg, the graphic depicts
cervical cancer as just the tip of the
iceberg, and really highlights the burden of cervical
precancers and other HPV cancers that
providers that may not be considering as the
part of the iceberg that’s underneath the surface. And then moving on to that
last segment that I mentioned, we know that, based on
anticipated parental refusal, some clinicians may treat HPV
vaccine discussions differently when compared to other
adolescent vaccines. We’ve also seen that
most parents will accept HPV vaccination when
it’s recommended on the same day, and in the same
way, as other preteen vaccines. So we’ve developed
our tips for talking to parents about HPV vaccine
fact sheet and web page, which is designed to assist
providers in making a simple, concise recommendation
for HPV vaccination, on the same day,
and in the same way as other adolescent vaccines. As well as providing
brief responses to some of the most common
questions that parents have. And now I’d like to share some
additional new and updated resources we have available,
that hit on one or more of these segments. This past fall we
launched a new video series called How I Recommend. And in this series
of short videos, practicing clinicians
explain how they’re achieving high
vaccination rates, and effectively answering
parents questions. We currently have videos with
four pediatricians and a family physician, and
these videos range– The questions that we
ask in these videos range from questions
about how to make an effective recommendation,
to how to answer questions about vaccine safety, to how
to handle parental hesitancy or refusal in their practice. And continuing with the series,
the next phase of videos that we’re developing
will feature some nurse practitioners, and so those
will be available sometime later this fall. One of the products that
we’ve had for several years is our You Are the Key
to HPV Cancer Prevention slide deck, which
really provides all the key information about
HPV infection and disease. HPV vaccine
recommendations, and how to have a successful
conversation with parents about HPV vaccination. And we’ve also made this
slide deck available as a CME activity on our website. So moving into a few
of our newer resources. We recently developed a
new clinician listicle. And if you’re not familiar
with the term listicle, it’s short for list
article, so it’s basically an article that’s broken
down into a list form, to make the content a little bit
more digestible for the reader. In this new listicle,
we provide five practical and proven
strategies that providers can implement in their office
to improve their rates. And each of the
items in this article is accompanied by a
corresponding graphic, which is designed to make
it easy to share on your social and
digital platforms. And you can see a preview
of one of these graphics on this slide. I also wanted to highlight
a new resource, which is our template reminder
letter, which providers can use to send to parents, to
remind that of the vaccines that their children are due for. It and includes
information about all of the routinely recommended
adolescent vaccines. So it really reinforces
that approach of bundling the adolescent
vaccines together. And not singling out HPV
vaccine, or making it seem different from
the other vaccines. And then the last resource
that I wanted to highlight is our new parent
listicle, which is “Six Reasons to Get HPV
Vaccine for Your Child.” And it’s really
to educate parents on the important role
of HPV vaccination in preventing cancer
for their child. And it provides six
compelling reasons for them to get the vaccine
for their child. Each reason accompanied
by a graphic that can be easily shared
through social and digital media platforms. And with the last
few minutes, I just wanted to highlight
our HPV Vaccine is Cancer Prevention
Champions Award, which we’re launching this week. And we’ll be starting to accept
nominations for the award. The HPV Vaccine is
Cancer Prevention Award is an annual award that
we partnered with the American Cancer Society, and the
American Association of Cancer Institutes on. And established in 2017
to recognize health care professionals who are going
above and beyond to foster HPV vaccination in
their communities. One of the things that’s
a little bit different this year is that rather than– last year we had a champion
for each of the 10 HHS regions. And this year we’re actually
opening up the awards to all of the US
states and territories. So we’ll be
accepting nominations from all state and territorial
immunization programs. And the state and territorial
immunization programs will also be coordinating
the review, and nominate– process of reviewing and
submitting nominations to CDC. And with– and then moving
on to the next slide, I just wanted to provide some
information on the criteria for nominations. So the– there’s minimum
nomination requirements, which are that, must be a condition,
clinic, practice, group, or system that treat
adolescents as part of their overall
patient population. And it also– they also must
have a minimum vaccination coverage level of 60%
series completion, according to the
ACIP recommendations for the patient population,
ages 13 to 15 years. And then additionally, in order
to showcase the nominees who are really doing– who are really leaders and
innovators in HPV vaccination, champions should
also meet one or more of the following
judging criteria. And those are leadership,
collaboration, and innovation. And we also have some
information on our website, and there’s a
nomination packet which includes some more details on
each of these requirements. And then I just wanted
to briefly go over the nomination time line. So this week, we will be
sending program materials to immunization programs. Informing them about the– that we’ll be accepting
nominations and providing materials to assist with
soliciting nominations for their area. And we’ll also be
updating our website with all of this information. We’re encouraging states
to receive nominations in August, 2018. The suggested deadline
is August 10th, 2018. But we encourage individuals
to contact their state immunization program if they
have a specific deadline. Additionally, we
encourage states to submit their nominations
to CDC in September. Specifically
September 14th, 2018. And we’ll also be sending out
this information this week. And then in October, the CDC,
in conjunction with American Cancer Society and the American
Association of Cancer Institute will be announcing
the champions. And then on the last slide,
I just wanted to go– just wanted to mention
some of the materials that we developed that we’ll
be sharing to support efforts to submit nominations,
which include a one page pager about the award
that can be used as– can be adapted as
talking points, or as a sample, ready
to publish article in newsletters or
on your website. We’ll also be developing a
nomination announcement email template to send to
potential nominees. I mentioned that
we’ll be sending a packet with nomination
forms and instruct– with the nomination form
and nomination instructions. And then additionally
sample social media posts that you can use to promote,
to encourage nominations. And with that, I’ll
move to my last slide. If you have any
questions, if you’d like to find any
of these resources, I’ve included contact
information, as well as the link to our HPV website. And with that, I’ll hand
this off to Jennifer. JENNIFER SIENKO: Hi. Thanks Ian. So my name is Jennifer
Sienko, as I was introduced. I am with the national HPV
Vaccination Roundtable. And I am one of the
directors, and I focus on our communications
and public engagement work. I’m– here we go. I’m really excited today
to tell you a story. And this is the story
of our summer campaign, called the Power to
Prevent HPV Cancer. So we have some great heroes. And the heroes are our content. And we need a little help. And that’s where you’ll come in. But first, let me introduce you
to the HPV Super Six Hero Team. This is a team of super
heroes with the power to prevent HPV cancer. Each superhero represents
a clinical audience, and is powered by a
clinical action guide. Each action guide was carefully
developed and rigorously reviewed by experts in
each target profession, and includes specific
tools to help HPV Super Six Heroes activate their special
power to prevent HPV cancers. We know how hard it
can be for heroes to keep up with, and compile
the latest research and evidence base for increasing
HPV vaccinations, on top of all of their
other responsibilities. That’s why the National HPV the
Vaccination Roundtable created six easy to use clinical
and system action guides. Each guide contains
tips and timesavers for increasing HPV
vaccination rates, and has been rigorously reviewed
by experts in each target profession. These guides are grounded
in evidence and trusted sources, such as the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention. We’ve done the heavy lifting,
and made it super easy for clinical audiences
to find and implement trusted, evidence based
strategies for increasing HPV vaccination. While there is consistent
messaging and information across all of the
clinical audiences, there is important,
role specific content for each audience. All of the guides
include information on facts about HPV
cancer, and vaccination. Why it’s important to
prioritize HPV vaccination at the preadolescent
age, and suggested actions and intervention for
each clinical guide audience to take. So for those of you on the
call, if you see or treat 11 to 13-year-olds as part of
your practice, your clinic, or your health
system, we invite you to join a powerful team of
six superheroes, all of whom have the power to prevent cancer
by recommending, delivering, or prioritizing the HPV vaccine. You have the power, and
now you have the tools. The six clinical and system
action guides will help you, and the rest of the
HPV Super Six Heroes, prevent a up to six cancers
caused by HPV infection. The HPV Super Six
are headquartered at hpvroundtable.org/power. And I encourage you to visit
them, to check out the content. Including the action guide,
and useful tips and tricks. So the Super Six
represent powerful content for implementers. But great content can’t help
if people don’t know about it. And that’s where we as
communicators can help. The Power to Prevent
HPV Cancer campaign was designed by the National
HPV Vaccination Roundtable to promote the specialized
clinical and system action guides to their
intended audiences, by asking professional
organizations, health care systems, and practices to
implement the promotional tool kit for eight weeks during
the back to school summer vaccination season. If you manage, or
have responsibility for the communications efforts
of a professional organization, health department,
or health system, that reaches health
care professionals, we have made it easy
for you to sign up to receive a suite of
tools to help you reach your specific audiences,
with the Power to Prevent HPV Cancer messages. We’ve created
communication toolkits that include audience brief,
website copy, newsletter blurb, eight weeks of unique
social media posts for Facebook and Twitter,
as well as ready to go images for use on social media. You are welcome to use
a copy in any frequency, in any way that you want. Its totally up to you. The only requirement
is that you stop using the content by
the end of August, or the start of
school in your area. We also encourage you to add
your logo to the social images, or to any of the content. The content in the
social media posts directs back to that power page
on the HPV Roundtable website. However, we are totally
encouraging of you linking back to your own organization
HPV pages, if you have them. But we recognize that
not all organizations have capacity to build pages
for all of their programs or priorities. So if you do not
have an HPV page, we welcome you to link to ours. It includes access to
all of the toolkits, as well as the
social media posts. But if you have your own web
page, or your own resources, we definitely want
you to share those. So this looks a little weird. But its a bit.ly link. So bit.ly/Power_SignUp. When you sign up,
you will not only receive a suite of
communication tools to help you promote accurate
and evidence based messages to your clinical
audiences, you will also receive bonus content for
National Immunization Awareness Month. And I hope that it will
complement what Catherine will showcase later in this call. So we have content for
implementers and providers. We have toolkits to
help communicators reach those relevant audiences. But if you are a
concerned citizen with a passion for
fighting cancer, and an individual
advocate, we also welcome you to join the team. Feel free to sign up and to
use the tools we have provided to help you empower the HPV
Super Six Heroes in your life. The clinical action
guides are a powerful tool for health care
providers, clinical staff, health departments, and
health care systems staff. And can be shared
directly with them. When we all work together, we
can just defeat HPV cancers. So every great superhero
story has an action sequence, where the fate of the
world hangs in the balance. And while hopefully no one has
a giant laser cannon pointed at them, this is your
moment to take action to aid the Super Six. We would love for
you to sign up. So go to that bit.ly
link, fill out the information to get access
to the suite of communication toolkit. Plan. Plan to promote the
content over the summer. You can schedule all eight
weeks of content, or just those messages that
resonate with your audience. And post. Post the Power to Prevent
HPV Cancer content. As a tip, we suggest
you roll out an image, which we have provided, with
a quote “super tip” message, along with links to your website
or to the Power to Prevent HPV Cancer website. And introducing the
power of repetition. So once again here’s the link. It’s a bit.ly/Power_SignUp. For those of you
who believe strongly in the power of
planning, here is how the eight weeks of
content are organized. You can schedule pots
for all eight weeks, or you can schedule posts
just during those weeks that are relevant to your
clinical audiences. This will help us all
speak with one voice. So I do have a poll question. And the question is this. Do you plan to sign up
and download the Power to Prevent HPV Cancer
Communications Toolkit? Yes, no, I’d like to, but
I’m just not quite sure how. Or I need assistance. I’ll give people a few moments
to respond to the poll. Awesome, it looks like a lot
of people do plan to sign up. For those of you who
need a little assistance, I have included my email at
the end of this presentation. I encourage you to
reach out to me. But also, I encourage you
to go to the bit.ly link, and sign up. And then once you
sign up, you might– some of your questions
might be answered. But if not, I’m always
available to you. So once again, the power
of repetitions at work. It’s bit.ly/Power_SignUp. And to quote a great
superhero, Superman– “There is a superhero
in all of us.” And when we all work together,
we can end HPV cancers. That’s the end of
my presentation. Thank you so much for
inviting me today. And here is my e-mail. I look forward to
hearing from you, and answering any
questions you might have. And now I will turn
it over Catherine. CATHERINE MARTIN: Terrific. Thank you so much, Jennifer. We’re so excited
to be able to have this webinar, our Back to
School Showcase webinars, featuring our great speakers
on HPV vaccine resources and strategies. And to be able to
share the great work that NPHIC and our
partners at CDC have accomplished once again in
developing this communication toolkit for all of you to use
during National Immunization Awareness Month. It gets bigger
every year, and I’m really excited about all
the folks that I hear from. In anticipation of launching
this campaign, and afterwards. About how they felt– how they about out the tools
that they were able to use. So one last polling question. Because we like our polls
now that we figured out how to use them. How many years have you
participated in NAIM? I know some of you have been
doing it ever since we started, years and years ago. Just a couple years, or never. Maybe this is your first time. And so really have something for
everyone on this presentation. Quite a few nevers. So I’m really excited
about that, too. So the NIAM toolkit, National
Immunization Awareness Month toolkit is now available. It’s hot off the press. I believe we got everything
together this week. And what’s exciting about
having this webinar today, is it’s still June. And we have June and July
to prepare for August. Sometimes we don’t get
these campaign material– you know some people
don’t get these campaign materials till it’s kind
of too close to the date. And now we have
ample opportunity to plan out our strategy,
our communication strategy, and our media strategy. Whether you are a nonprofit
like my organization, a coalition that has a
little bit more flexibility in how you can manage
your communications, or if you’re working for a state
or local health department, or other entity that
requires approval. A lengthy, or you know at
least some approval processes. This gives you a
lot of time to be able to take these
messages, tools, media, and graphics to
your organization, and have it approved in advance. And the great thing,
also, and what I hear from other state
departments of health, and other public
health communicators, is that they know where
these messages came from. They know that the NPHIC and the
CDC have vetted these messages. So they are very comfortable
with these messages, and the tools that
we’re able to share. So you’ll be able to find that
toolkit on the NPHIC web sites, specifically. nphic.org/niam. And here it is, where you
can download the toolkit. As you see you’ve
got the capacity to download the full, toolkit
and the logos and banners. I download everything
in a special file, so I have it all ready
for myself and my staff, so we can prepare some
ready to go messages. That’s one of the
great things now. You can look pretty
awesome by prescheduling in your tweets and
your Facebook posts, to be able to move
along through NIAM. So again, very similar to years
past, the central messages throughout the
toolkit are, vaccines precast protect
against diseases. We still have diseases
in our community. Outbreaks do occur. We have a lot– unfortunately we have
a lot of experience with that the last couple of
years in the United States, and elsewhere. And we can use those stories,
and bring in these messages to be able to share
those with our community. Whether your community
is health professionals, or your community is the public. Obviously vaccines
are recommended throughout our lives,
and this campaign is tailored to highlight the
importance of vaccination across the lifespan. And again, the opportunity
to remind our community that vaccines are very
safe, and very effective. Objectives of National
Immunization Awareness Month is to highlight the value of
immunization for all ages, disseminate these
coordinated messages, and especially utilize
social and digital media to reach our target audience. So drum roll, please. So we’ve got the
themes for NIAM 2018. And we’ve got– it’s broken
up into weeks, generally. Close to the end of
July, beginning of August is where we’re pushing out
messages on back to school. August fifth through
11th, pregnant women, and encouraging mothers
to protect themselves. And be able to pass
protection on to their babies. Starting August 12th, we’ve
got babies and young children. A healthy start, beginning
with on time vaccination. Preteens and teens, during
the week of August 19th. And August 26 to 31st gives
you a really good chance to promote flu vaccine. And to remind adults that
vaccines are not just for kids. We’ve got a lot of opportunities
to vaccinate adults from childhood on. A lot of people don’t
feel they’re vulnerable, and of course we know
that is not true. Everybody needs to be protected. However, I wanted to mention
that these campaigns, while they are broken up
into themes during weeks, they are not– you are– you can,
[INAUDIBLE] your organization, your state can do– in part you can control this,
put the out campaign together, for whatever suits your needs. You can move these
around if it works better for you to do
something for adults early on in the month. It is of course perfectly fine. Some coalitions or
other organizations, they are focusing
maybe more heavily on maternal vaccinations. And so they may use NIAM
just to focus on that during the month of August. And that’s what’s wonderful
about this campaign, is it has got the capacity
to tailor it to your needs. So really quickly I’m going to
run through just some sample graphics, which are
similar to years past. Around our back to school– these are graphics, images. Be sure to download those
banners and graphics. It makes it super easy to
be able to get these out into different social
media platforms, or use them on a header
within your website. Again, on your
Facebook posts, and– or on your Facebook cover. On your Twitter cover. As well as any print material
you might be sending out. I want to highlight, and I
didn’t get this updated before. We had our start of our program. But the communication
toolkit specifically has tips for communication
and media relations. And so you’ll want to
update yourself on that. That part of the
toolkit as well. That’s all been updated. While the graphics may
look similar in the past, the toolkits have
been slightly updated, with new messages and
updated information. I wanted to highlight
some of the resources within the toolkit. Sample key messages. I use those a lot to create
some of the tweets and posts and Facebook messaging. Again, tailoring it
to your local needs, or something else that’s
going on in your community. Or in your organization. Specific vaccine information. Frequently asked
questions, which are really great to be able to
share with the media, or parent groups. Other professionals. Sample news releases
and drop in articles. Great opportunity to
get information out to your newsletters,
online tool. Sample social media messages. I have to say, I use this a lot. Because it’s so great to
be able to plug that in, as I said earlier, into
the platform you use. I use Hootsuite, where you
can set up the messages, schedule them for the week. And then I found–
then I add other things as I find news articles,
and other information. But at least I got those
messages scheduled. Logos and graphics. It’s all about the visuals, now. So you want to be sure
you’re adding visuals wherever you can
in those tweets. So there’s lots of
great resources there. And web links and resources,
to continue the great work. I think I got ahead of myself. So that communication
toolkit was first. And I also want
to reference back, the media outreach toolkit. So as you see, you
can look around on the NPHIC web site,
toolkit section for all of the information there. And it’s terrific. We also love to
hear your feedback. I may mention this
again at the end, that there’s also
an opportunity. We want to hear about what
you did in your community during NIAM, and how you feel
your campaign was effective. And also, how– what else
you need as communicators. Again, some pretty pictures,
banners, very subtly different depending on what you
need in your community. And there’s a lot more. These are just a sample. But I want to mention one more
time about getting social. About promoting vaccinations. I had the opportunity
yesterday to speak with a group of
international health leaders. They were here as part
of a leadership program, sponsored by the
State Department. And we had a really
great discussion at the end of our presentation. They were learning about
coalitions, and how we do our work in California. What was very– and
we had individuals from Nigeria, Romania, France. Malaysia, Mexico. It was a great opportunity. One of the things
that we did share, the United States shares
with these countries, is the impact of social
media on parents. And how– what they choosing– some of the choices that they’re
making based on what they’re hearing in social media. I found– I thought
that was fascinating. And we know that while there
is negative information online, and shared through
social media, we have the capacity and the
opportunity to get even a lot more messages out there. And to direct people to
the credible sources, and be the voice for
science, and for the facts are so important. It is a challenge, but I
think it’s very possible. And it was heartening to see how
many wonderful partners we have in the world. In addition to
the United States. I wanted to mention, of
course, these are some of the– some of the platforms we use. And Instagram, of
course, is out. And Instagram video, which I
have not dipped my toe into, but I think that’s going to
be another great opportunity to be able to communicate
with our stakeholders. Again, use of sample
social media messages provided in the toolkit
to promote vaccination. Hashtag is #NIAM18. Also consider vaccines
work and vaccines. #vaccineswork and #vaccines. You know, we have a used
#TeamVax in the past, so I may change the slide
up for the final posting. But we’ll post all
the other hashtags, in case I got this wrong. from last year. But we want to
use those hashtags that everybody else is using, so
we maximize our resources here. So I’m looking forward
to questions and answers at the end. And my NPHIC
colleagues to help me if I forgot any of
the key items there. But again, very excited
to be able to share this campaign with you. Right on time. We’ve got it posted this week. And looking forward to
hearing about what you are doing in your community. So I’ll had it back to you, Tom. TOM SCHAFER: OK. Thanks, Catherine. And thanks Ian and Jennifer. We are excited about the
great work that’s going on, and the opportunity
to use NIAM in August to help promote
immunization awareness. Now we have time
for some questions. And I’d like to
remind you that you can ask a question by typing
it in the lower left hand corner of your screen. And Catherine is going
to come back on here, and she’s going to moderate
the Q&A portion of our webinar. Catherine? CATHERINE MARTIN: Great. Thank you very much. One of our first
questions is, how do you get a provider that
is set in their ways to highly recommend HPV? And that’s for Ian or– IAN BRANAM: Yeah, this is Ian. I could talk a little
bit about that. I mean, I think one thing– and I think that’s
difficult. And I think one thing I would
say is, the value of peer to peer influence
is really important. And I think that if there
are HPV champions that can influence providers
who are set in their ways, and whether it’s somebody– a leader in cancer, or
another pediatrician who can talk about
the important role that HPV vaccination plays
in preventing future cancers, as well as– That can kind of
articulate how to make an effective recommendation. And how it’s something
that can be implemented into their practice. And really that it
doesn’t add additional– it doesn’t have to add
additional time to their visit. And that it can actually
make the converse– It can actually shorten the
conversation with parents. If they are giving a simple,
concise recommendation for HPV vaccination. One of the materials that
we developed to try and get to that peer to peer aspect is
how I recommend video series that I mentioned, that
features practicing physicians who are achieving
high vaccination rates. And they’re talking
about how they overcome some of these questions
that parents have, and how they are effectively
recommending the vaccine. CATHERINE MARTIN: Excellent. Any thoughts on that, Jennifer? JENNIFER SIENKO: Just
to echo what Ian said. That there is a lot of
evidence that short, concise, presumptive recommendation
on behalf of the provider, but on behalf of also
an entire medical team. So the MA, who might
be taking the family back to the clinical room. The front desk staff who’s
welcoming them into the office. Without having the
entire clinic on board with a pro-vaccine
message, has been shown to be really, really helpful. One, it socially
norms the vaccine. And two, the parents
feel that they’re in a welcoming space, where
if they have concerns, they can ask them. But they’re not sort of
being led down the path of, do you think you want this? Parents are really looking
to the medical team to give them unbiased and
accurate medical information. CATHERINE MARTIN: Perfect. Thank you. I’m gonna hop around a little
bit on the questions here. Love this one. Is there– has there
been a consideration, or some conversation
about developing a quote, “How I recommend” video
for pharmacists, or– and additionally, an
action guide specifically for pharmacists. We know a lot of people
are getting their vaccines in the pharmacy. IAN BRANAM: This is Ian. We’ve certainly been discussing
additional audiences that we– that work in– that we’ve
considered expanding to for how I recommend. At this point, our
primary focus has been on pediatricians,
family physicians, and we’ll be expanding
to nurse practitioners. But I think we’re always
trying to consider additional audiences that
may benefit from this. CATHERINE MARTIN: Yes. Sounds great idea. One of our questions is about
some of the materials here. Are the front and back flyers
for providers available online, or to order? Something that our speakers
referenced earlier? IAN BRANAM: This is– Yeah this is Ian. I can speak to the
flyers that I mentioned, which are all available
on our HPV web site, which is cdc.gov/hpv. And they’re under the clinicians
section of our website. I believe that talking to
parents about HPV vaccine fact sheet, and the iceberg will
be available for printing later this year. CATHERINE MARTIN:
Another question regarding providers,
and recommending HPV vaccination for boys. If they are not as familiar with
the updated recommendations. How do you get providers
to recommend HPV for boys? If they are not– if they may not believe
the science there for boys. IAN BRANAM: I mean I think
that goes back to that one– the segment on clinicians
that I mentioned. That they may not be aware of
the true burden of HPV disease. And I think that there, we’ve
developed a lot of resources to help educate providers
on the burden of diseases beyond cervical cancer. So the cancers that
HPV causes in boys. And I would also say that
we’re encouraging providers to talk about HPV– to normalized HPV
vaccine conversations recommended the same way
for all their patients. CATHERINE MARTIN: Any additional
thoughts on that, Jennifer? JENNIFER SIENKO: Yeah,
I would just say, the ACIP issued the
vaccine recommendation for boys and girls. And they did not just arrive
at that recommendation. They studied the evidence
base, and the literature, and so these are really smart
people who have, as their job, sort of do this. And I think that the
evidence is there. So I would, one, encourage
them to familiarize themselves with the ACIP
recommendation if they don’t think that the
science is there for boys. But also, you know,
human papillomavirus is an equal opportunity
infection agent. And even if they don’t think
that the disease burden is there for boys, I would
hope that there would be some recognition that their– boys play a part
in transmission. So if they believe that
there is evidence base that HPV vaccination
is effective for girls, because it prevents
infection, which can prevent later
m including cancer, then hopefully they could
buy into the logical argument that, if you can prevent
boys from getting infected, you can also then prevent their
partners from getting infected. CATHERINE MARTIN: Terrific. Thank you. I think that’s very helpful. So one of our questions
our participants asked– based on all of the
available resources that you as experts have
been helping to produce, and are seeing out there
for increasing provider recommendations, can you– are able to highlight which
one you feel have been most– the best received? Most effective? Are there some of the tools,
or mechanisms for distribution that you feel– or that you’re hearing
are most effective? IAN BRANAM: I can talk to– I can speak to my– the resources that I
mention, and then Jennifer, if you want to talk
to the resources that your group offers. I’ll say that our You Are the
Key to HPV Cancer Prevention slide deck has been kind of
one of our foundational pieces. And I think it’s been a really
helpful resource for educating providers, and ensuring
the whole office staff is on the same page. So I definitely would
highlight that one. And I think that our tips for
talking to parents about HPV vaccine has been a
really helpful one pager, that providers can quickly– and it’s very simple
and easy to read. Provides practical, concise
responses to parents questions. And that’s a resource that
we’ve had for a few years, now. And has been one of our
more popular resources. So I would definitely
highlight those two resources. And then to the
resources that we have that are a
little bit newer, we don’t have quite as much
to go on for that, yet. But definitely I would say
I highly recommend videos. We’re seeing the importance
of having materials available in formats that are
digital and mobile friendly is really important. And having that peer to
peer aspect of showing a provider who’s doing it– who’s achieving high
rates, talking about what they do in their practice. I think that’s been
really important. And people have really
been receptive to that. And that I would also– I think that the
iceberg graphic has also been kind of an eye
opener to a lot of people, about how much
disease HPV causes beyond just cervical cancer. CATHERINE MARTIN: All right. JENNIFER SIENKO: Yeah,
this is Jennifer. So in addition to the
How I Recommend videos that CDC has produced,
which are excellent, the HPV Vaccination Roundtable
produced a series of videos with HPV cancer survivors. And some of them are survivors
who are interviewed along with their care provider. And we also have a short
video with a caregiver whose mother passed away
from HPV caused anal cancer. So the videos showcase
female and male survivors, cervical, oral pharyngeal, anal. The Department of Health
in Iowa has developed some amazing survivor videos. They’ve a particularly
moving video of a gentleman who was a
penile cancer survivor. His cancer caused by HPV. These videos, we show
them at our meetings. I’ve seen them shown
before webinars. They’ve been used
in grand rounds. And they are really powerful. We’re hearing through
some evaluation work that we’ve done that
they are really, really powerful for pediatricians. As Ian mentioned, HPV diseases
tend to not occur in childhood, and so pediatricians
don’t routinely see them in their practice. So this is a way to bring
those stories from sort of the oncologist,
or the gynecologist, or those
oral-tongue-laryngologist– I can never say that word. But the head and neck surgeons,
and the gynecological surgeons, and the oncologists can
say, don’t let your patients become my patients. And we found that to
be really powerful. We formatted the videos. They’re very short. I think at the longest
they’re five minutes. And they can be edited
to be even shorter. Those to you who are
interested in using them, you can find them on our
website, hpvroundtable.org. Or you can email me,
and I can definitely connect you to the library. CATHERINE MARTIN: Great. Thank you. You know, we have time
for one more question. Let’s see. Want to find out– a participant wants
to find out where to find the scripting sheet
to mail out to patients, letting them know what
vaccines they are due for. Did we answer that, or did you– IAN BRANAM: I can respond to
that after the call, if you’d like, I can send
this specific URL. Are but it’s available on our
HPV website, www.cdc.gov/hpv. Underneath– in the
clinicians section. CATHERINE MARTIN: Right. Perfect. Thank you so much. I wanted to give our speakers
has one last couple of seconds there to give us
some final thoughts. Maybe something
we didn’t get to. I know we’ve got a lot of
questions coming in at the end. And we will be able to
respond to a couple of those, specifically. Any final thoughts, Jennifer? Ian? JENNIFER SIENKO: Sure. IAN BRANAM: Yeah, you
go ahead, Jennifer. JENNIFER SIENKO: Go ahead. Well, I just wanted
to say thank you for inviting me to
be on this webinar. The VIC network is– directly represents
the audience that we are trying to reach with
our communications toolkit, so I greatly appreciate
this opportunity. Someone in the chat had asked
about materials in Spanish. We don’t have any of our
Power to Prevent HPV Cancer materials in Spanish. However, we are very
open to collaborating. So if you represent
an organization that has capacity to translate,
we can make all of the files available. None of our files are copywrit. You don’t need to sign
a licensing agreement. So if that’s something that
you think your organization has capacity could connect use
to someone who has capacity, we are very
interested in creating multi-lingual resources. We just don’t have that
capacity on the staff. So, please reach out to me. Thank you so much for those of
you who tried the bit.ly link. It is case sensitive. I’ll put those back in the chat. But if you have any questions
about the way to go about it, just e-mail me. Thank you. CATHERINE MARTIN:
Yeah, and we’ll put something on
VIC network site. Quickly, Ian any couple words? IAN BRANAM: Yeah, I want to
put in a final plug for our HPV Champions Award. We’re really excited to launch
the second year of the award, and we think it’s a great
way to recognize health care professionals who are really
leading the way in preventing cancers in the future. And it’s a great way
to be able to share effective strategies that
are being done on the ground, with– across the country. So I would just
encourage you, if you know of a provider, or clinic,
or a health system that’s doing a great job with
their HPV vaccination rates, I’d encourage you to submit
a nomination to your state or territorial
immunization program. CATHERINE MARTIN: Perfect. And we will pose that Champion
information on our VIC network site, as well. Back to you Tom. We’ll wrap it up. TOM SCHAFER: OK,
thanks Catherine. One real quick thing. There was this
question about Spanish. I wanted people to know
that all NIAM material is being translated into Spanish,
and will be available soon. So check back to the
NPHIC website for that. Again, thanks to our presenters
for sharing their time and expertise today. And thanks to everyone for
attending today’s webinar. We hope it was informative and
helpful to your immunization efforts. And just a reminder
here, don’t forget to complete the evaluation
form that will automatically appear after this broadcast. Your thoughts and opinions
are important to us, and help shape
future presentations. And I know people
have been asking. We will be posting this
webinar on the VIC network, and CDC site soon,
along with the slides. And thanks so much
for joining us.

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