Ramin Sayar, Sumo Logic | Sumo Logic Illuminate 2019

Ramin Sayar, Sumo Logic | Sumo Logic Illuminate 2019


>>Speaker: From Burlingame,
California, it’s theCUBE. Covering Sumo Logic Illuminate 2019. Brought to you by Sumo Logic.>>Hey, welcome back everybody. Jeff Frick here with theCUBE. We’re at Sumo Logic Illuminate 2019. We’re here at the Hyatt
Regency San Francisco Airport. It’s about 800, 900 people. Packed house in the key
note earlier this afternoon. We’re really excited to have the guy the was running the whole show, and is running the whole
show here for this company. He’s Ramin Sayar, the president
and CEO of Sumo Logic. Ramin, great to see you again.>>You too, thanks for having me.>>Absolutely, so third year of the show. Second year of us being here. I wonder if you can just kind of reflect on how this thing is growin’.>>Yeah, man. I think it’s really a
testament to the community, more so than Sumo. We’ve seen a lot of growth naturally, because of where customers are with their own adoption of
technology, such as cloud, but also the transformations
that they’re going through, like digital transformation
and cloud transformation. So naturally that allows
for more audience of people to attend a conference like this, because this is not a sales
and marketing conference. This is a user conference, and as evidence by the fact that 60 plus percent of the
content is users themselves and the community presenting.>>Right. You talked about the theme is
really this intelligence gap, which was really a key
piece of the key note, and it’s interesting ’cause
just talking ‘about data, and huge amounts of data flow, exponential growth in types of data, flow of data, sources of data, and yet, data is just data
until it turns into information. Then if it turns into good information, then actually it could maybe turn into some with intelligence, and some action that you
can do something with. But there’s no person that
has the ability to manage the data flows now that
we’re starting to see. So you guys are really
coming at that at the core, you’ve been at it for a long time, you made some great early
on bets being cloud native, and now really starting to
see the benefits as this exponential growth of
data just hits everybody.>>Yeah, you’re spot on. I think, maybe to add to that, I think the challenge that we see, despite the tsunami of data growth, is that a lot of
organizations still struggle, because they lack the
ability to be able to share the insights and intelligence they gleam from this data. So a lot of the things we spoke
about at the key note today, was the whole notion of the
intelligence gap that exists. That’s predicated on the
fact that we’re all going through some sort of transformation, or migration, or business model change, and with that comes five
challenges that we talked about, with respect to continue
this intelligence. We internally as, actually
referred it to as, a challenge of minding the
gap of the intelligence trap, because we need to help our
customers become intelligent, and collaborate and communicate
much more effectively, by virtue of what we’ve become. That what we’ve become
is that trusted partner, that data steward, that is sitting on all this
valuable insights that we need to be able to provide continuously to our community of users.>>Right, and you talked about it, really out along three
different metrics, right? The operations metrics, which is probably what
people think of top of mind, the security metric and then
as well as the business metric. We had Robert Parker on earlier
from Samsung Smartthings, and he made an interesting comment that there are pervasive
users of Sumo Logic, within the company. Which I thought was really interesting, because everyone’s chasing innovation. How do you get innovative? I think one of the core ways
is you give more people, more access to more data, and the tools to actually
do something with it. That seems to be a big piece
of the Smartthings story, and that’s really a big part
of your guys’ messaging.>>Yeah, I think unlike other vendors, who have restrictions
on adoption and usage, or charging by user model, we’re trying to make sure
we tear those silos down. By nature, one of the
things you have to do is provide ubiquitous access. Second thing you have to do is, be able to address all
different types of data, so you can get value for all those users on ubiquitous access. You hear about that through,
not just Smartthings, but a lot of the other customers and partners that are here today, because that’s unlike the old models.>>Right, right. It’s interesting, it reminds
me back to ’97, ’98, ’99, when we first started seeing
people build web applications, and they had all these pricing
models based on, you know, cores and CPU’s, ’cause it was based on how many employees were inside the walls, and would have access to the applications, and they’d try to apply
this to a public webpage. It doesn’t work, but we still see some of that
nasty legacy stuff though, right? And what, now it’s 20 years later. So you made a big announcement today, about really changing your pricing model to more fit the realities of
the world in which we live.>>Yeah, look on the surface
why, it seems revolutionary. It’s not. It’s evolutionary for Sumo. It’s something we’ve been
doing since we first started. For example, we always provided a service that charges an average for the month, not for the penalty of going over a day. We didn’t charge for users
’cause that’s antiquated model. More importantly, we actually provided an economic model all along
that mirrored the business model of all these companies. So the more you ingest and use,
the lower your cost become, not more.>>Right.>>The things that we announced
today is a further commitment that we’ve been making to the community, and effectively taking the
headache away from them. If you look at these other tools, for example that provide
observability for monitoring, or for security, you have to go calculate the count the licenses. You have to go look at the
number data point for a minute. You have to look at the number of nodes, and who wants to manage software? You want to manage services. So what we’ve done is really taken an existing licensing model that we have, to the next level, and to providing a credit based system, so that you can flex and
choose what you want to use, in a given day, in a given month, in a given period or cycle, across a new suite of packages, or a suite of products
that we brought to market.>>Right, or whatever you’re optimizing for that particular day,
that particular moment, that particular business unit.>>But it also ties to
something you mentioned earlier. It actually helps tear down those silos that other vendors are creating, because it provides ubiquitous
access to all users, for all different types of data, right? Instead of tryna keep those
silos in separation that exist, that further challenges
the intelligence gap that we’re seeing in the
intelligence economy.>>Right, another great
slide I thought earlier in the key note was
given by Anheuser-Busch, and he talked about his
security infrastructure, and all different layers of security, and the solution that
he has for front door, and phishing, et cetera,
et cetera, et cetera. But the great thing is, you basically crossed all
those applications stack, and it’s a pretty interesting position for you guys to be in, to be able to integrate
with all these other, kind of point solutions, that
make up parts of the puzzle, and to bring it all back, and to still have this one ubiquitous data analytics platform to go in and do stuff with that.>>Yeah, I think it’s, truth be told, something we’ve been
doing for a long time. I think the visual that you saw there is the challenge that a
lot of our customers have. Specifically, they have
these silos of end point, or firewall, or email, or whatever else, and they can only make sense of it by leveraging the monitoring of those silos to an intelligence platform like Sumo. So, the same thing that
you saw on security with Anheuser-Busch,
being able to leverage the silos into intelligence
platform for security, we see in the monitoring
space for developers, and operations teams. So they’ll have silo tools, but observability is not it. You need continuous reliability, and therefore, you need to
be ale to take all those different types of data and signals, just like you saw in security for the different types of infrastructure and applications that you’re managing, and provide an intelligence
based system and service, not a monitoring based
only system and service.>>Right. Another big trend that’s happening, you guys are riding this wave, and you had Jennifer up from Google cloud, and she had the same
presentation on Anthos, I think at the Google cloud
platform summoned earlier today, The momentum behind hybrid cloud is the whip saw of let’s all jump into public, and then let’s not jump
in, then it’s hybrid, and it’s multi. The fact of the matter
is everything’s goin’ to where it’s suppose to be, which is it’s workload specific, and the work’s load should run, where the work load should run. Really a great momentum for you
guys to be able to leverage, ’cause regardless of where
the work flow’s running based on where it should run, I’d need to see it in a unified
front back at the ranch.>>Sure, but Jeff, I
think this is what we saw, even last year, when we put
the continuous intelligence report out then. Let alone the changes we saw this year. For example, we saw container technologies move from development
to production last year in north of two x growth. Now we’re seeing orchestration
technologies like Kubernetes more than two x growth. What’s driving the
multi-cloud comment you made is because the customers
want flexibility and choice of where those workloads run. Historically, the haven’t
been able to do that, until now leveraging contain
orchestration technology, that builds an abstraction
layer from the IIS, for infrastructure as a service layer, and obviously the testament
to what Google’s been doing with Anthos, and the
partnership we have with them to develop and integrate
things for Anthos, Istio, and service mesh.>>So what’s next? What’re you looking for? I can’t believe we’re
almost done with 2019, that still shocks me every
time I flip the calender. What are your priorities going forward, another great event, 2020, the year of insight and all knowledge. Where’s Sumo going to be?>>We started down this journey
before the market was there, and I think the unique
position and fortunate position that we’re in right now is
more and more that market opportunity’s coming to us, and the community’s getting more powerful, and stronger day by day, and year by year. So we’re very early
innings of this, honestly. What do we see going
forward’s your question, is a lot of the execution of our strategy that we set out a while ago
to build the only continuous intelligence platform,
and more importantly, the new category of software
called continuous intelligence, that’s really mirroring
the operating model, and economic model of every
single digital business that needs to thrive, not just survive.>>Right. In an era of exponential
growth of data, complexity, sources, types, which
is a good place to be.>>Indeed.>>All right, well Ramin,
I know you’re super busy. Thanks for taking a few minutes, and congratulations on a great show.>>Thanks for having me back, appreciate being here.
>>For sure. All right, he’s Ramin, I’m Jeff. You’re watching theCUBE, where it’s Sumo Logic Illuminate 2019. Thanks for watching,
we’ll see ya next time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *