Social Media Workshop with the Richards Group 2019: Caitlin Mitchell

Social Media Workshop with the Richards Group 2019: Caitlin Mitchell


– All right, my name is Caitlin Mitchell. I am a digital strategy
director at The Richards Group and I specialize in social media. And I’ve been doing this about a decade and it has been quite a ride. Things have obviously changed a lot over the last even three years. I’ve worked on all kinds of things from Coca-Cola to Home Depot
to currently Keurig Dr Pepper. So really happy to share with you a lot of what I’ve learned
throughout my career and I hope that it helps you as you go in to North Texas Giving Day. To start, what we’re gonna do today, so we’ll first start with just an overview of the social media landscape. I find it’s really helpful
to just take a step back and kind of see where we are today and how things have evolved. Then we’re gonna go through
a couple of different best practices for each
individual social channel for how you guys will use this
for North Texas Giving Day. And then I wanna end on
really making an impression and making sure that your
content really stands out. So to start, let’s start with the today’s social media landscape. And this is one of my favorite slides. I think it really stands out. You’ll notice that there are a lot of Fortune 500 companies
up here on this slide. But what’s interesting is since 2000, 52% of these companies
have either gone bankrupt, they’ve been acquired,
or they cease to exist. And there are a lot of reasons
why this has come to be, but one of the main reasons
is they were not able to keep up with how things were changing and how technology was moving forward. So a really great yet sad example is, you know, think about Blockbuster. I mean they had the chance
to purchase Netflix. It was on their desk, they passed, and where is Blockbuster today? I know that there’s a Twitter
account, The Lone Blockbuster. So that’s where they are. So don’t be these guys. But what’s important to know is even in the advertising industry, never before have we
seen such rapid change. When you think about what
our deliverables used to be, you know 10, 15 years ago,
a big idea was a TV spot, a 15, a 30, a 60. Maybe you’re doing some on-premise, some radio, a billboard, a bus stop. And then we look at where we are today and how things have evolved. To kinda put it into context, it took 38 years before 50 million people gained access to radios. 13 years before 50 million people gained access to television. A year and a half before 50 million people gained access to Instagram, just to show you the speed
at which this has moved. And it’s changed all our deliverables. And to be really honest, this deliverable list that
you see on the right in red, it changes quarterly, it changes monthly. I mean we’re doing everything
from in feed stories, carousel ads, skippable bumpers, display influencers,
website search, you name it. This list has gotten really long to do an integrated campaign really well. But it helps to take a step back, I know the deliverable list can be a little bit overwhelming, and just look at how did we get here? How did things move so
quickly in social media? Where did this all stem from? And I like to go back to Facebook ’cause Facebook truly really was the guinea pig with paid advertising. So back in 2006, it was
all about your fan base. Grow your following, get
all of these fans here, and you could talk to
them for free in 2006, which is like a marketer’s dream. It was amazing talking to
all of these people for free. But we don’t pay for Facebook. Facebook went public,
they had to figure out hey, how are we gonna make money? How are we gonna monetize? So what they did was, hey, we
know we told all you brands to gather these communities
and buy all these fans, but now we’re gonna restrict your reach and you have to pay to play. So if you are not putting paid money behind your post on Facebook, you are only reaching about one to 3% of your total audience. And this is huge because
if you think about all of the resources that go into
creating social media content, if you’re creating a ton of
content that’s not being seen, that’s not doing much
for your organization. So really important to know you have to pay to play to do this well. And because of this, because of how Facebook has
evolved their business model, other social platforms
have really followed suite. No one’s really playing
the organic game anymore. They’re immediately coming
out with ad offerings. So because of this, ad
spending has skyrocketed. So this is gonna be a $34
billion industry by 2020. So a lot of scale here, a
lot of movement happening. And when we’re advertising
in this environment, it’s important to think about how the user is using these platforms. And oftentimes we hear
a stat that we have less of an attention span than a goldfish, which I’m not even sure how you measure the attention span of a goldfish. I never quite understood that. Anyone who knows that, hit me
up after ’cause I’m curious. I don’t think it’s that we have less of an attention span than a goldfish. I don’t think our attention is shrinking. It’s just that it’s selective. There’s so many different
devices that we have, there’s so many different
ways that we can be pulled, that we’re very selective about where we spend our time and
where our attention goes. So it’s really important
that we keep this in mind when developing social media content. And a big portion of the type of content that we create is video. And when you think about video, you have to remember
all video is skippable. Who in here skips ads? I skip ads too. Don’t tell Stan Richards. But we can’t wait to get to our content. We’re on YouTube and we’re
looking up a puppy video and we have to watch an ad. It’s just annoying. So how can we make ads
that aren’t annoying that people really care about? And that starts with recognizing
content is skippable, even paid content, and
users have the choice if they wanna skip you or not. So if you look at it kinda
here, I think this helps a lot ’cause I’m not just talking about YouTube. Your feeds, you can just
fly right past a post and never even know who the advertiser was if you’re not really utilizing creative best practices to stand out. So I’m gonna show a couple
of really great examples that tap into the skippable environment and try to capture your
attention from Dr Pepper. – I make the best times better. Hiya! Blasted skip button! – Do you need help, Dr Pepper Cherriot? – Don’t look at me. Dr Pepper Cherry, cherry on! – So this was crafted specifically for YouTube to run in front of a video, but it played right into that
button, the skippable button. It knew the environment that it was gonna be placed in and played to that. Another good example
from Dr Pepper as well, I don’t know how many of
you know Little Sweet, but he’s basically our
spokesperson for Diet Dr Pepper and we found an innovative
way to kinda hack the feed. So here you see Little
Sweet liking himself. And Facebook didn’t let us do this. This is just a video that we created and it’s a complete hack of the feed. But you have to find innovative ways like this to be able to stand out and really capture people’s attention. It’s really important. And so in thinking through
creating video content, standing out, making sure
people aren’t skipping you, I think it’s helpful to
think about your narrative. So before you go and shoot a video, really think about the type of
video that you’re putting out and how you’re gonna hook people. And if we think about
traditional narrative, so I’ll show you an example
here in just a second, but typically you have a lead
in, a build, a big reveal, there’s an offer, and then
there’s some branding. And this really doesn’t work
in today’s digital environment because five seconds in, if
you don’t know who it’s from and it didn’t hook you, you’re out. So to show you an example of this, I’m gonna show you an ad that ran on TV, it was not for digital, but
try to guess who this brand is. – [Narrator] Rick Blomquist
of De Pere, Wisconsin. His life is pretty comfortable. – So we’re five second in.
– He lives in a comfy home. – [Caitlin] No clue who the brand is. – [Narrator] Wears comfortable shoes. He even has a comfortable job. Rick Blomquist thought he had comfort all figured out.
– Midway through, still don’t know who the brand is. – [Narrator] But then he laid on a Serta and realized his life was
only just sorta comfortable. – I’ve been living a lie. – [Narrator] The new Serta
iComfort Hybrid Mattress. Not just sorta comfortable,
Serta comfortable. – So not trying to pick on Serta, but kinda picking on Serta. I mean if you look at this, you can see how this
wouldn’t work in digital. You don’t know who it’s
from, it goes on and on, there is no really clear hook. This could never work in
a digital environment. And a lot of advertisers,
nonprofits, brands, even Hollywood is starting to take cues
for how to make this better. So to show you a lesson from Hollywood, when you think about the
evolution of movie trailers, how they used to be. The first five seconds used
to be just this screen, which this also would not fly
today in digital environment. Then the next six to 10
seconds were then this screen. (car engine revving) Then the 11 to 30 second mark you start to know what movie it is. And then slowly the action builds up and you see this following
that traditional. – You like to come and see the world with me.
– Narrative. – (gasp) You mean it? – Well now Hollywood is really developing their trailers for an emerging story arc. They no longer can do that
because that’s not gonna work, that’s not gonna capture
people’s attention. So when they’re crafting video, they’re thinking about
how do we start high, how do we have subtle brand cues, unexpected shifts, multiple peaks, and then make you wanna
go visit a landing page or go check out additional
bonus content somewhere else to really get a good feel
for what the movie is doing. And so if you take a look
at movie trailers today, you can see the difference. (dramatic music) Very quick, straight to the
point, a lot of action in front, hits you with the movie
three to four seconds in, and that’s it. And this is the type of content
that Hollywood and Netflix and everyone is running on social and you can see why it’s working. Immediately captures you, you
understand what’s going on. So with all of that said, we know we’re in a skippable environment, we know we have all of these challenges, especially with video,
in crafting our story. How are we gonna use social
for North Texas Giving Day? First off, I’m sure
everyone’s really familiar with the theme, get up and give. We went through a lot
of the great resources that you can tap into on the site. When I kind of put the plan together of the key phases to focus on, and this is totally a suggestion. Feel free to take this
and make it your own, but I started with okay, from now to 8/10 you could really run
save the date messages. So just driving awareness around the event and that you want your
donors to participate. The why I give hashtag is a great way for a crowdsourced opportunity for people to fundraise for you. So having your donors put
out messages of why I give and using our filter and kind
of educating them on that, that could help a lot for really rallying people to motivate. So you could do this from
now up until Giving Day. Then of course we have
the fundraising pages. The peer to peer
fundraising is 8/1 to 9/19 where you could really push
that with scheduled giving running 9/9 to 9/19. Of course we have Giving Day the day of, we wanna drive donations. And then you can do some
sort of event recap. So this is totally just my stab at how I would kind of
look at planning out this campaign with different posts and where you would need to craft content. So with that said, these are the channels that I would recommend we would also use. So Facebook, Instagram, Instagram stories, Twitter, and LinkedIn. And I’ll walk through some best practices of how you can really
make the most of them. And I’ll start with
Facebook and Instagram. So I put them together. One because Facebook owns Instagram, but there’s a lot of
similarities between them that can be really helpful
when crafting content, especially if you wanna repurpose. So to start with some
quick hits on Facebook, one billion users access it on mobile, so you have to be crafting content that is mobile first to stand out. There’s 38 minutes per
day spent on Facebook. And then there’s a high
prevalence among all age groups, so each age group has 50% or more of their total age group on Facebook. So you’re really gonna cover the gamut when you’re on Facebook
and reach a lot of people. For Instagram, there’s one
billion monthly active users. So 63% of U.S. adults are
using the app every single day. There’s 27 minutes on
average spent on Instagram, especially for those who are under 25. And this is really promising, especially for all of us in this room. 75% take an action after seeing a post. So they’re driven to a website, they shop or they tell a friend
about what they have seen. And when we look at the two feeds, they’re definitely similar,
but there are some differences. So the first thing is they’re
both moving very fast. They’re frequent. People are checking them
up to 14 times per day. You’re in a sound off environment, so that’s really important
with crafting video because you can’t just rely on sound. You need to somehow incorporate text. And when we think about the differences, Instagram is a little
bit more passion focus. So you have people following hashtags, you have them following influencers and content that they’re
really passionate about. And we look at some key considerations for crafting content for them. I’ll walk through a few of these. So first, tell your story visually. This is huge. 85% of video is played
without sound on Facebook. So here in this example, you
can see just complimenting… That didn’t play, there you go. Just complimenting the visuals with text overlay helps a lot. Guide people through the image or the video that you’re presenting so they know what content
they’re about to kinda take in. Use text and graphics to
help deliver your message. So this is a fun example of where the graphics kinda come through. Leverage subtitles with videos. So if you do have a script, make sure you’re leveraging that. And then make sure your text
is less than 20% of the visual. So if this is on a video
and you’re promoting it and you have a lot of text,
Facebook will flag that as spam. It will let you choose a cover frame and you’ll just have to make sure that cover frame is less than 20% of text. The next tip is keep it simple. So again, people are
flying through these feeds. Make sure that you have one key message and that you are delivering on it. So you need to capture attention in the first two to three
seconds like we talked about with that emerging story arc narrative. Focus on really short,
easy to digest content and try to keep it under 15 seconds. If you have a reason to go
long form, absolutely do it. I don’t wanna discourage
anyone from doing that, but make sure that there’s
a reason for people to really hang on to that
long form piece of content. Another great tip is just
maximizing your real estate. So everyone is on mobile,
they’re on their feeds, going through Facebook, not desktop. So developing your assets for a one by one or four by five dimension is huge. You can see just on the screen how much more space it takes up and that’s just a quick easy kinda tip to help you stand out within the feed when you’re competing
with all of this content. There’s a lot of different ad types that you can consider running
for North Texas Giving Day. The top three that I would
recommend is one, video is great. That’s gonna be more of the
KPI for awareness in views. You want someone to view
the piece of content that you’re putting out there. Photos are really for engagement and then the link carousel ad types are to drive site traffic. So leveraging those,
especially the day of, is gonna be very important. You can within the backend of Facebook go into Facebook Creative Hub. And if any of you haven’t visited this, I highly recommend it. It’s an awesome to mock a post up. But you can build out your link ads. So here you see we have a one by one aspect ratio dimension
and then in the backend you’re able to customize
and add the donate button and put all of the bells
and whistles on your post that you need to within Creative Hub. So please take a look at that resource. It’s great and it’s provided
for free from Facebook. We also have a Facebook event. So this was just started last week, so make sure to share this to your pages, encourage your donors and everyone to share this on their own personal pages just to make sure that
we’re getting involved and the community is more
than aware on the day of that it is North Texas Giving Day, there’s no mistaking it. Facebook Live, I do think the
day of and possibly before, if you have a compelling
reason to go live, I think it could be a great thing to do. I’ve seen some previous
examples a few years ago here in this room from nonprofits that took advantage of
it in a really great way. You are able to now add a donate
button to your live videos if you’re a verified page on Facebook and have gone through that process. The one thing to keep in mind is if you do add the donate now button, it’s not gonna link to
the North Texas Giving Day website or anything like that. So this is more just a good tip for you to know in general to leverage. Now moving on to Instagram. So again, Instagram and Facebook are a little similar in their ad types. So you can leverage image, you
can have a carousel ad type where you can tap through
up to 10 different images, or you can do a video and
this can be up to 60 seconds. And keep in mind when you’re in feed, again it’s gonna be sound
off for Instagram as well. A couple key features to take
advantage of on Facebook, which was mentioned earlier,
is the profile picture frames. So if you go to your profile,
click update profile picture, this will walk you through
exactly how to do it, you’ll have the option to
upload photo or add a frame. You’ll click add a frame and
then you’re able to search for the North Texas Giving Day 2019 frame to then put within your profile. So a really easy, simple
way to get involved and show people what you’re doing. Hashtags, so I would
definitely say Instagram is way more hashtag
friendly than Facebook. So if you search the North
Texas Giving Day hashtag, you’ll see a bunch of posts come up. It rates the top post by the
amount of traction that it got. So make sure that you are just kinda paying attention to this. People can also follow the hashtag, so you could follow multiple nonprofits the day of if it’s
leveraged and it’ll show you kind of the realtime
feed of what’s going on with people using that hashtag. Moving on to Instagram Stories. So we do break out Instagram Stories as a little bit different
because the creative you develop for it will be different. To start with some quick hits, there’s 500 million stories posted daily. Credible amount. 31% of users post every month, 47% of users watch
stories at least weekly, and brands make up 1/3 of
the top viewed stories, which is a great stat for us. People are watching and engaging with branded content within stories. When thinking about how
the stories feed works, again it is different from the Facebook and Instagram in feed. So there’s more of a raw content
feel with Instagram Stories and you are able to go full
screen and it is sound on. So that is a big
distinction to kind of think through in developing your creative. You’re going vertical and it is sound on. A couple key considerations
for creating Instagram Stories. So people are really used to not seeing super polished content
on Instagram Stories. You can have more of a user
generated content feel. So be sure to tap into that. Leverage the sound on feature. There’s a lot of different
native tools and text overlays that you can play with
and ger really creative. And also consider sharing UGC. And if have donors that are posting and you wanna share an
awesome post that they did, feel free to do that. That’s a great way to kind of make your donors feel a part of your nonprofit and really feel a part of the community. Another great tip is capture
attention and keep it, which has kind of been
a key theme of today. But users in stories
can easily skip content, way easier than in feed. In feed, you know you
are scrolling past it. Stories, you can just tap right through so you have less than
three seconds to stand out. You really have to get everything you’re looking for in the first second, focus on that short digestible content. You can use multiple frames
though to tell a longer story. So you can see here in
this example, they’re back. You can see them leveraging text overlay, kind of talking users
through the piece of content that they have and then
where to get this pan. And then this is kind of
a fun way to use video to tapping to change different colors. There’s just a lot that you
can do to get really creative with how you wanna leverage
lot of their native features. The vertical space is
huge in Instagram Stories and it can really allow
you to be really creative. I loved these examples. I pulled them from ad week, but it shows you just how
you can leverage video and different mesmerizing
things to really pull you in. This one’s kinda fun. Hey Nick, you use way too much icing. Challenge accepted. You see the icing go
all the way to the top. There’s just a lot of
creative applications for how you can use the vertical space and make sure that you really
stand out in this environment. There’s also additional
features that you can use to really amplify your creative. So Giphy stickers are huge
within Instagram Stories. If you do have over 10,000
followers and you’re verified, you can do a swipe up and actually drive to the North Texas Giving Day site. You can do polls and emoji stickers. And they recently released
a donation sticker, which is pretty great. So you can, it should play right here. This video shows you how to get to it, but you can search different nonprofits and if you’re verified, you’ll pull up. Again, this is just
kind of a nice to know. This won’t drive donations through the North Texas Giving Day site, but it could drive donations
for your nonprofits. We definitely wanted to make sure that you were aware of that. Moving on to Twitter. So I definitely would say Twitter should be on a lower
priority of where you should focus your attention for social media because it really is a news channel. A realtime news channel
with how things are trending and going on throughout the day. So it makes a lot of sense the day of, but I wouldn’t put a
ton of time and energy throughout the whole campaign. But there are 500 million tweets per day. 93% of users access it on mobile and 31% of users are more
likely to recall what they see. And this likely could be
because they’re very engaged when there’s a realtime
trending thing happen. Just like the other feeds,
this moves really fast. Visuals stand out and pop to you. It’s all about cultural relevancy and it’s very conversation focused. A couple ways to leverage
Twitter for crafting content here is again capture attention
quickly, utilize images, keep your copy concise and to the point. Users are three times
more likely to engage with videos and photos and
tweets than just plain text, so make sure you’re really
leveraging media here. And start a conversation. Again, this is a realtime news channel, so especially the day of,
of North Texas Giving Day, post your progress, let
people know what’s going on. You can include all of the relevant hashtags that we talked through. You can interact with your audience through polls and asking
different question. So there’s a lot of
different creative ways that you can start a conversation and really build relationships on Twitter. And then of course hashtags
are very prevalent on Twitter so highly recommend using the hashtag throughout your campaign and polls. And then here’s just some
stats on incorporating media. So where you’ll go to do it, again no more than two hashtags per tweet. You can have a link if
you need to say more. People are three times more
likely to engage with a visual and utilize open ended questions. And then the last channel
that we’re gonna walk through is a channel that I think
is really underrated and that I still think
has a lot of room to grow and for people to get really creative with and that’s LinkedIn. It is a huge channel, so 630
million users in 200 countries. 50% of users visit LinkedIn every month and posts with images see
double the amount of comments. So again the theme of you really have to stand out with photos and videos. Some key considerations
here is leverage your team and your employees and their
networks for awareness. Don’t just think about
the different content that you can just do on
your nonprofit’s brand page, but how can your executives get involved on their own personal LinkedIn pages to really help your cause
and push things forward and create in depth
content to maximize reach? So people are spending
a little bit more time in leaning into LinkedIn content. They’re more likely to
read blogs and articles. So figure out creative ways to craft longer form content here. This is gonna be a great channel for that. So there are company pages. So if your nonprofit
doesn’t have a company page, I highly recommend going to set this up. You can leverage a variety of different pieces of content for it. So you can do photos with links, you can do video, you can do articles, or you can do a slide
share if you have content. How you’ll do your updates
is you’ll go to post, click update. You’re able to add an image. LinkedIn recommends to do hashtags. That was a recent update last year. So make sure you put
North Texas Giving Day. And you can tie different
topics to your article as well. And ask people for responses. Get them to engage with you, find ways to tag them and
really get them involved. Videos, this is definitely a
sound off environment as well, so make sure you keep that in
mind when crafting content. You can add text overlays
and take advantage of different things that are
similar to Instagram Stories. You’ll kind of notice throughout
all of these channels, they kinda start to copy each other and incorporate a lot of their features. Articles, I think, are
majorly underutilized and we put in a great
example from Big Thought. So Bryan Sanders doing a
article around 10 reasons to give to Big Though on
North Texas Giving Day. And this was a great
article, really in depth. Articles, you can be more long form. So they do best when they’re
more than three paragraphs. So about 800 to 2,000 words. You can add a cover image and make sure that you’re standing out. You can even do a video
if you wanted or a GIF. And keep your voice authentic. Think of it as a two-way publishing and again don’t just think
about your company pages, but think about how your executives can really leverage this as well. So to kinda cap out how we’ll leverage all of these channels. Facebook, we saw the stats on how people are really leveraging Facebook to drive to the North Texas Giving Day. It’s a huge referral for all of us in here so drive traffic here. Use it for awareness, use it as the main place
to invest in your content and to really bring new donors in. Instagram is gonna be all about creating that visual inspiration and awareness around North Texas Giving Day. Stories is again that more raw feel. It’s gonna be more behind the scenes. Really great to leverage kinda the day of and give people a peak
inside your war room. Twitter, great for building relationships and utilizing the hashtag and
trends to really jump into. And then LinkedIn, a great
resource for thought leadership and a great way to get
your executives involved. And my overall recommendation too is maximize your resources. And I would say this to any company. Fewer, bigger, better. Do fewer channels and pieces of content. Just pick a couple channels. Don’t feel like you even
need to do all of these. Pick the ones that make the most sense for your organization to go after. Make sure you have a
media spend behind it. It doesn’t have to be significant. You can do as few as $20 on Facebook, but make sure that there
is some media behind it and that you’re being targeting
on who you’re reaching. And that’ll result in high quality better creative that you can push out if you’re able to maximize your resources. So all of these best practices in everything is really great, but I wanted to end on
making an impression. And I think that this
concept is pretty interesting of that conversations are
greater than impressions. And what do I mean by that? So here’s a lot of great
soda content that’s up here, all following best practices. And best practices are great
because when you’re putting paid dollars behind your content, it ensures that your
impression is valuable and it’s going to be seen
and not skipped through. But best practices don’t ensure
that your content matters. I can sit here all day and give you all kinds of different tips, but that’s not gonna
ensure that people care about the content that you put out. So it’s important to go
back and really think about what made social media
great in the first place. It’s people that decide what matters in social media, not brands. So really figuring out
for your organization what do your donors care about? What do your donors wanna hear about? What stories wanna be crafted? I mean really kinda think through even doing mini focus groups with those that you are talking to to get good ideas. Talk to the real users that
are using these platforms to make sure that you’re
not just screaming on these platforms and
no one is listening. And a really great filter that I put on any piece of content that we
put out the Richards Group is making sure that to
be worthy of attention, you have to create an
ownable brand moment. And so to me that’s, you look at what does
the world care about? What does your brand care about? What does your target care about? And in that sweet spot, that’s really where you’re gonna find the really great content
that you wanna go after. And I think leveraging focus
groups and the real donors and the real people that
you’re trying to reach, it’s a great way to do this. But ultimately, when we looked
at that deliverables list, when we look at really
great integrative campaigns, this is what I think really rings true. Today’s big ideas should
lead to meaningful concepts that reach real people, not ads that go ignored,
skipped, or blocked. These are meaningful brand
actions that actually engage us. They get people thinking,
laughing, even crying. This is something you would
wanna spend valuable time with, something you would talk about, something your friends would talk about. That is social energy. And really, North Texas Giving
Day is one big brand action. I’m challenging you all. Go and figure out what is your brand action
for your nonprofit? How are you gonna stand out? How are you gonna make people care? Thank you. (audience applauds)

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