Society of the Knights and Squire Awards ceremony

Society of the Knights and Squire Awards ceremony


(soothing music) – Welcome, everyone, to the ninth Society of Knights and Squire
Award induction ceremony. My name is Pawan Pandey. I serve as CCRI student ambassador, and I’m very happy to greet you tonight for this special occasion. First, I would like to thank you all. I will be graduating in May,
after two and a half years, and I am a product of
your support of college, (audience clapping) as a recipient of CCRI Alumni Association and some other scholarship. I do not have enough words, to thank you for your generous kindness. So far, I have maintained a GPA of 3.96, (audience clapping) and I am determined to finish my four year degree in computer science. It was impossible for me
to even dream about that without your kind help. To give you a little perspective, allow me to share my story in brief. I was born in India and
I was raised in India. Somehow the very special qualities that make me a very good student here wasn’t good trade for a student in India. I, somehow, finished my
high school, somehow. After that I found that those of educational institutions
are closed for me. Partly because of my social activism, and party because of economic conditions. Given the choice, study or not, I chose to learn through life experience. I worked hard and I managed to make a respectable place in that society. During that same I met Stephanie Abbott, who was doing some research in India, we got married and I moved to the U.S. So love brought me here. (audience laughing and clapping) Very soon, I realized
that my good social skills and a sophisticated skill
in the Hindi language is not good enough to craft a
meaningful career in the U.S. For me, for my family, and especially the community of Rhode Island, which has given me so much love. Having a history of
being told several times that education is not my cup of tea, especially not math, not science, I’m glad to inform you that at CCRI I have finished engineering
level of physics and calculus level of
math, Java programming, and especially in math and science I never scored below a 95. (audience clapping) It was impossible for me to
do so without your kind help. Your kind help has given me courage that if I work hard, and
if I do things correctly, there are people in my community that are going to support me in any way. Your kindness has given me support that I am doing everything right, I’m going in the right direction, and especially, your kindness
has given me extra hours. Last semester, your generosity slashed my tuition fee in half. Instead of working for minimum wage and arranging that fee, I was able to focus on my subjects. I utilized that time to serve in my student government
and through different clubs. I utilized that time serving
in my student community. All this experience has
given me a sense of pride, a sense of self respect, and also a sense of responsibility. It has given me that confidence that I will be able to craft a meaningful career for me and not only that, I will help others, they same way, the help I got from you. Once again, thank you for helping me, supporting me, and inspiring me. Now, it’s my pleasure to
introduce Marisa Albini, the director of alumni affairs at CCRI. Miss Marisa. (audience clapping) – Thank you so much. Thank you Pawan, that was very inspiring and it tells how all of the support that the alumni and friends give to us and how we can help out Pawan and other students just like him. Welcome, again, and this is
our ninth Society of Knights. I want to thank our
sponsors who have sponsered tables and sponsored
awards and all of that. I just want to make sure that you know that we really appreciate your help. I also want to thank the committees, the selection committee for the Society of Knights and the Squires, the alumni board, the event
committee for tonight, I think they did a
great job, and marketing and communications who’ve
really made us look really nice. Thank you all. (audience clapping) I would like to now
introduce the president of the Community College of Rhode Island’s Alumni Association, Joseph Fleming. Joe is the class of 1974, he
likes to say he was the first full class at the Knight
campus to graduate there. Joe worked for Pawtucket
school department for 33 years. Anybody from Pawtucket here? Anybody? I don’t think (laughs) (clapping) His positions included
social studies teacher, mathematics teacher, and coordinator of attendance and discipline, so you don’t want to go see Joe. He retired in 2009 from
his post as vice principal at Slater Junior High School and now he’s full time president
of Fleming and Associates, you might see him on channel 12, public opinion and research
and political consulting firm. Joe, welcome. (audience clapping) – Thank you very much. It’s a pleasure to be here tonight, and I also want to thank
everybody for being here. The Society of the Knights
and the Squire Awards are very important to the college and the alumni association. This helps us raise money for students who may need money for
text books, scholarships, or emergency aid to get
their last class to graduate. The Alumni Association has been very active over the last couple of years trying to move forward raising money. This helps greatly. I also want to thank the committee, they did an outstanding job, and the staff at the college for helping
put all this together. I want to congratulate
all the award winners, the five Society of Knights
members, and our new Squire Awards, the first
inductees to these awards. Again, congratulations all. I’d like you to join me in welcoming CCRI’s president, Meghan Hughes. President Hughes joined
the college in February as the fifth president of the college. Before joining the college, she served as executive director
of Year Up Providence from 2009 through 2015. During that period she doubled
the size of the program and Providence site constantly
lead nationally in metrics, including student retention
and positive outcomes. Meghan is an Aspen Institute fellow for Community College Excellence. She was recognized by
the renowned foundation with it’s Community Leader Award in 2015 and was named Outstanding
Woman of the Year by U.S. Representative
David Cicillinie in 2014. Meghan is a true champion of education, and behalf of the Alumni Association I want to welcome you to your first Society of Knights event,
but also to the college. The Alumni Association looks forward to working with you
together and collectively using our resources and your resources to help the students and
alumni of the college. I had the opportunity to meet with Meghan, she is a brawl of fire,
she has so much enthusiasm for students in this
college it is unbelievable. I see there are great
things going forward, the President of CCRI, Meghan Hughes. (audience clapping) Thank you so much for
the introduction Joe, and thank you so much Joe,
Marisa, Mike and Jane, our event chairs, and the committee, the entire institutional advancement staff and Erin, who not only
helped prepare my remarks, but also, I am proud to say,
introduced me to Twitter. I am now a Twitter,
tweeter, something, right? And everyone for creating such a beautiful, inspiring even tonight. And thanks to all of you for being here tonight
to celebrate with us. Today marks two months since
I joined the CCRI communtiy and I am truly honored to be
part of this great institution which has helped prepare so many students to go on to further degrees and into quality careers. This evening we honor an
elite group of alumni who have helped build remarkable
careers and accomplishments. Their stories are
inspiring and can showcase the true impact and opportunities a CCRI education can provide. Our awardees include successful Rhode Island business owners, vice presidents of non profits and higher education,
including our own college, nursing and health care professionals, educators, accountants, a school district assistant superintendent, a lawyer, a director for Senator
Whitehouse, and an actor. I’m so grateful to have
had the opportunity to meet and talk with our
honorees earlier tonight and I look forward to
partnering with you all to move this college forward. I have had the distinct
privilege to work with one of our honorees tonight,
Dr. Rosemary Costigan, and I am called to say
a few words about her. (audience clapping) Rosemary has stood beside me from the first day I
arrived at the college. Rosemary, I knew we were cut from the same Irish Catholic
cloth the first time we met. You told me that long
before Coach Belichick coined the phrase, do your job, it belonged to your father,
and it belonged to mine too. I know your parents are here tonight, you have raised a remarkable daughter. As Interim Vice President
for Academic Affairs, Rosemary leads a number
of key college initiatives all designed with one goal in mind to serve more students better. It’s just this simple, CCRI’s
advancement will succeed because we have her and
her teams’s commitment and leadership, that it must happen. Rosemary, I’m so deeply grateful for your exceptionally hard work and dedication to the
college and to our students. So to all of our honorees,
congratulations again. Your professional
successes and contributions to our college, our
communities, and our state, make your alma mater so proud. We will tell you more about each of our honorees later in the program. To all those in attendance tonight thank you so much for coming out to support this exemplary group
of alumni and our college. Finally, I want to extend
a special thank you to the world class faculty and staff, some of whom are with us tonight, for welcoming me so warmly, and for the tremendous work you do
everyday to make CCRI great. Tonight I’d like to take just,
I think it’s two minutes, to share my quick vision
and near term focus. Simply stated, it starts
with our students. I want to begin by making sure every single one of our students know that you matter to us and that we see you. If we can make sure that all students believe that they matter
to their teachers, to our staff, then they
will find it easier to persist, to come to
class when they’re tired or anxious about the material. This is where everyone
in the room comes in, since graduating it’s first class, CCRI has awarded more than
66,000 degrees and certificates. That adds up to a significant alumni base, and it will take a village
to accomplish our goals, and my team and I need you to stand with us as we move forward. I am calling on you,
our alumni and friends, to be the closest circle of this village. You can help today by pushing, supporting and coaching our students. You can be that someone beside them who, even on their most challenging days, will let them know that they can and they will accomplish
their goals and graduate. Our students and recent alumns need you to coach and support them on their journey towards
our graduation stage and on to further education
and quality high paying jobs. We are launching a
mentoring program next fall and I ask you all to come join that. It is our goal to make the
Community College of Rhode Island the best community college
of New England by 2020 and I know we can do it together. Our college will focus in three key areas, and remember P-C-T, and tweet it out, persistence, completion, and transfer. Right now we have committed faculty and student services
staff working together to make sure that our students have a clear map to graduation and the support they need to get there. The willingness I see every day, at our college, for our
team to try new things, to work together and to commit
to significantly improving in these three areas is
deeply inspiring to me. We’ll have some tough
days, but we will mostly have the significant reward
of knowing we are creating real socioeconomic opportunity
for our deserving students. In closing, my sincere congratulations to all of the graduates
being honored tonight, and thank you, you are each a part of the history and legacy of CCRI. Your successes and stories
inspire our students. They look at you and begin to believe that maybe one day,
they can do what you do. Please enjoy the rest of the program, and I look forward to working together, to making CCRI the best
community college in New England. I will now pass the program
back over to Joe, who will begin the award ceremony for this evening. Thank you. (audience clapping) – [Joe] Good job, thank you. Thank you President Hughes. Obviously with her enthusiasm, you see there’s great things
coming forward for CCRI. It is now my pleasure to
ask Major David Tikoian and Mike Montecalvo to join me on stage. Major Tikoian recently retired from the Rhode Island State Police as a member of the command staff after 23 years of service, and now works at Providence water as a division manager. He’s a 1989 graduate, and a 2013 member of the Society of the Knights. Major Tikoian will serve as our Lord for the knighting ceremony. I would also like to
introduce Mike Montecalvo and thank him for joining us this evening. Mike has been a long time
supporter of the college and we appreciate him for taking the time out of his busy schedule
to be here with us tonight. As you know, Mike is WPRI
TV channel 12 news anchor. and will introduce the honorees tonight and tell you a little bit
more about them, Mike. (audience clapping) – Thank you Joe. Now how many of you on election night watch channel 12 because of Joe Fleming? (audience laughing and clapping) I love to tease him. Thank you very much for
inviting me again this year it is my pleasure to be here. Somebody asked me when I came in, “What are the big stories today? What’s happening, we’ve been in here.” and really the big story all week has been really, what happened yesterday, those two fires in Providence, and what the firefighters did
to rush into the buildings and to make sure that everyone was saved. That Providence firefighter, who was in critical condition last night, is breathing on his own
and he’s doing great today, (audience clapping) and driving up I thought
about how many graduates from CCRI have gone into
police and fire work. We heard President Hughes talk about all the different backgrounds. I know my cousin Mark
is a graduate from CCRI, he’s a lieutenant on
Woonsocket Fire Department, so we have so many, not only that have gone on into communications, but also have saved peoples lives every year, and I think that deserves
a round of applause for making us a better society. (audience clapping) Tonight we’re going to recognize a number of outstanding individuals whose lives, career, and community service have really made a difference in the state of Rhode Island,
and really in this country. Please refer to your
program for more information on each of the alumni
receiving awards tonight. When you hear your name, please come up to the stage, right here, and we’ll get the ceremony going. Lord Tikoian, I present to you Candida Castillo, the class of 1994. (audience clapping) Candida is the owner of Aesthetic Dental Studio of Rhode Island. She came to the United States from the Dominican Republic at age 17. She began her college career
at CCRI by taking ESL classes. She graduated from the
dental assisting program and went on the achieve her
Doctor of Dental Medicine Degree and to open her own successful practice. Candida, on behalf of the
entire college community, it is my privilege to
induct you as a member of the Society of the Knights. May you always be loyal to the Community College of Rhode Island. (audience clapping) (background noise over talking) (audience clapping) – It is great to be here
and I’m very excited. I’d like to say that I am very pleased, honored, and humbled to receive this award and also to share the night with my family with the rest of the alumni,
and with everybody here. I to say thank you to my family for their love and support, and to the alumni community for
selecting me for their award. I think of 1994 when I graduated from CCRI and how proud I was for my achievement. Little I knew, that was a little luck of, was inspiring for the passion in dentistry that I love and this is what I do today. I have to say that I’m very pleased and humbled to also be
part of the CCRI family for the opportunity that was given, the only opportunity to
learn how to speak English, to receive financial aid, to the doors that were opened to me
in terms of the community and also to be able to network. I am very pleased and, again, humbled, to be part of CCRI family, thank you. (audience clapping) – Thank you Candida. Lord Tikoian, I present to you Kathleen Charbonneau, class of 1983. Kathy is the vice president and director of community relations for Bank Newport. In Kathleen’s role at the bank, she proactively seeks opportunities for community partnerships, building and maintaining relationships
with community based charitable and non profit organizations. After CCRI, Kathy attended Bryant College and obtained her bachelor’s degree in business administration,
and Providence College where she was awarded a Master
of Business Administration. Kathleen, on behalf of the
entire college community it’s my privilege to
induct you as a member of the Society of the Knights. May you always be loyal, to the Community College of Rhode Island. (audience clapping) – Thank you President Hughes, and thank you Mr. Fleming and
the CCRI Alumni Association, fellow recipients and
Squires this evening. It’s a sincere honor to be inducted into the Society of the Knights. I was humbled to be nominated by Bank Newport president and past Society of the Knights
inductee Sandra Pattie, and by Senior Vice President Wendy Kagan, who is here this evening. I’ve had the privilege of working with Sandy and Wendy in a variety of professional and community capacities over the years and they honestly inspire me everyday,
so I was very humbled. And to my husband Jeff,
who chose to obtain his associates degree as
a CCRI evening student, thank you for your
continued love and support, and thank you for my family
that joined me this evening. It means a great deal to be honored by the college that has provided me with such a valuable foundation. One that has enabled me to accomplish many things, personally
and professionally. When I reflect on my CCRI experience, well over 30 years ago, I recall the early mornings when my father would drop me off at the Knight campus in Warwick on his way to work. My father was an educator, and a high school guidance counselor, so he naturally, reinforced
the value of CCRI as the next chapter of my education and my personal growth after high school. Thank you Dad, and thank you Mom. You two inspired me graduating from CCRI’s licensed practical nursing program, while juggling a household
and a family, so thank you. Just going to, take this for a second. I also reflect on how I was challenged in such a positive way at CCRI. I learned to persevere, to
be confident in my skills and I learned the value
of different prospectives, whether that was from fellow students or also from the supportive instructors, just as I mentioned in the video, Mrs. Quazaro, Mrs. Zotum, Miss Broderick, they all come to mind. They were experienced in
the business environment, they were able to share relevant
real life lessons with us. They genuinely wanted up to succeed and to put our skills and
knowledge into practice, and to be confident professionals, and to be assets to our future employers. CCRI also instilled in me a
desire to continue to learn, like so many students
who set forth from CCRI with the same desire, I worked full time and furthered my education
as an evening student, and I’ve continued to learn from the many individuals
and valuable experiences that my career path has afforded me. Once again, I’m so
grateful for this honor, and I thank you all for your
attendance here this evening. Your presence confirms
how we all value CCRI. I encourage individuals of all ages to begin, or even enhance,
their life’s path at CCRI. The experience will truly help
increase the value of you. Thank you. (audience clapping) – Thank you Kathy. This is truly a Rhode Island story, Kathy and I worked together years ago. I worked at 1037 WRX. How many of you remember
the classic rock station. (audience clapping) Kathy worked at the
Rhode Island Blood Center and we used to do blood
drives all the time and she was a real go getter. When you see about giving back, I’m not suprised that
Kathy was honored tonight for everything that she
has done over her career. It was great working with you back then and good seeing you again today. Our next Society of Knights
inductee is Rosemary Costigan. (audience clapping) Lord Tikoian, I present to you Rosemary Costigan, class of 1978. She is currently interim vice president of academic affairs for CCRI. At a younger age than most
traditional college graduates, she was already working as a nurse in the intensive care
unit, and transitioned to the operating room a few years later. She kept climbing the academic ladder, earning a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Rhode Island College, followed by both a master’s and a PhD in nursing from the University of Rhode Island. Answering her professions,
calling to educate it’s future nursing leaders, she has been an adjunct professor at URI, a professor and department chair of
nursing level 1 at CCRI, and as well as the interim assistant deam at academic affairs nursing
education, also at CCRI. Rosemary, on behalf of the
entire college community, it’s my privilege to
induct you as a member of the Society of the Knights. May you always be loyal to the Community College of Rhode Island. (audience clapping) – I would like to thank
my colleagues in nursing for nominating me for this
most prestigious award and for Alumni Society,
to Alumni Association, to accept that nomination and select me for this most memorable award. I am a classic story of
a CCRI student, graduate. My mother was forced to leave school in the ninth grade. I’m a first generation college graduate. It was 1930, the youngest of, (audience clapping) She was the youngest of five and she was the only
one that could get work. She wanted to be a nurse, and remarkably, she instilled in me a passion for nursing, having never worked in the profession. It is a tribute to her
and to this institution. I entered Rhode Island Junior College first class into the Lincoln campus, and first full class to
graduate from that campus. It not only opened it’s
doors to me and embraced me, it taught me and it made me believe in me and the possibilities. I would also like to
thank Dr. Meghan Hughes, for the confidence and support that she’s provided to me
over the past two months. It’s been a pleasure serving as interim vice president
for academic affairs. I’m excited for the future, and I know CCRI’s best days are
ahead with her leadership. To my colleagues, my family, thank you for all the support that you’ve provided for me over the years, both as the academic goals are reached and professional goals were sought after. Thank you very much, enjoy the evening. (audience clapping) – Thank you Rosemary. Please welcome Marjorie Martiesian. Lord Tikoian, I present
to you Marjorie Martiesian who is one of the members of
the first graduating class. She was a reading specialist for 28 years in the Providence Public School District. After graduating from CCRI,
she earned her bachelor’s in education at Mount St. Joseph College and then a master’s degree in education from Rhode Island College. She’s been a member of the
CCRI Alumni Association board now, for 12 years. Marjorie, on behalf of the
entire college community, it’s my privilege to
induct you as a member of the Society of the Knights. May you always be loyal to the Community College of Rhode Island. (audience clapping) – I would like to thank
the Society of Knights committee and the Alumni Association for honoring me tonight. CCRI is very dear to me. Without CCRI I don’t know whether I would have achieved my dream of going to college and
eventually becoming a teacher. None of us, the members of the first class who entered the building
on Promenade Street in September of 1964, realized that we were becoming part
of Rhode Island history. I now realize that we had become part of an amazing institution that would grow to be the largest community college in New England. Thank you for allowing me to be part of this amazing college
from the beginning. (audience clapping) – Thank you Marjorie, good evening. Lord Tikoian, I present to you Louis Saccoccio, class of 1968. (audience clapping and yelling) He has a big fan club
here, I guess, right? (laughing) Since delivering his commencement
address to his class, Lou has sustained a leadership
presence in the college serving as the president of
the CCRI Alumni Association from 2012 to 2015. Building on the experience he gained with the colleges debate and law clubs, he decided to pursue a career in law. He completed his undergraduate work at the University of Rhode Island, and then attended the
New England School of Law where he graduated with his
Juris Doctor back in 1974. He worked in private practice until 1990, and then joined the URI legal department as assistant legal counsel. He was promoted to
general council in 1995. Lou, on behalf of the
entire college community, it is my privilege to
induct you as a member of the Society of the Knights. May you always be loyal to the Community College of Rhode Island. (audience clapping) – Now don’t you just love it
when they put the lawyer last. (laughing) Now Marisa said I have two minutes, now the only way a lawyer can put anything down in two minutes is if
you kind of, control it. So I made some comments, and Marisa it’s as close to two minutes as I can get. (laughing) In any event, first, I truly want to say to my fellow inductees of
the Society of the Knights and recipients of the Squire
Awards congratulations. I’m honored to be on this stage with you. I want to thank Marisa Albini, the Society of the Knights committee, the Alumni Association
board for this recognition. I’m truly honored. I want to give a big thanks to all of you for participating in this celebration. It’s your support that helps us raise money for our students in the form of scholarships and book awards, and I really do appreciate the
turnout that we’ve had today. I think it’s a record breaking turnout. To my family attending this
evening, what can I say? Especially my wonderful wife Marie, my daughter Marisa, Ma-ree-sah, (laughing) got them mixed
up, my son-in-law Joe, my sister-in-law Laurie
and brother-in-law Norman. Now my parents are both
deceased, they couldn’t make it. (laughing) But I know they’re smiling. My other parents are here tonight Louis and Deloris (mumbles). You guys are the greatest, I love you all. I have a lot of colleagues at CCRI that I’ve come to know over the years, I can’t name them, a lot
of them are here tonight. I want to that you also for
your support for this event. And then finally I would be remissed if I didn’t give a shout out
to my friends and colleagues form the University of Rhode Island. I’m surprised, guys, and
thank you for you support, and most of all for your friendship. Now I’ve got to tell you something, at URI, there’s a group
of us, faculty and staff, that we meet everyday,
sometimes for lunch, sometimes for breakfast, sometimes both. Believe it or not, we’re
known as the round table. (laughing) For those of you who are here tonight I want you to spread the word, starting Monday, you will
address me as Sir Louis. (audience laughing and clapping) In all seriousness, when Marisa called and told me that I’d been nominated for this award, or this
recognition, I was speechless, and I know that’s unusual for a lawyer. She finally said, “Lou,
are you still there? “What do you think?” I said Marisa, I really
don’t know what to think. I said I’m surprised, I’m humbled, and I’m certainly appreciative
of this recognition, and as I stand before you
tonight I feel the same way. I started thinking of this, and (laughing) when you get to be my point, I started saying it’s 50 years. In the fall of 1966 I
was, believe it or not, a skinny, 18 year old kid from Cranston, and I enrolled as a
student, it was then known as Rhode Island Junior College. The college, as everybody has heard, was located in an old foundry building on Promenade Street in Providence. My class would become the
third graduating class, and I was also shocked when I became the student commencement
speaker for that time. None of us really knew what to expect, this was a brand new idea in Rhode Island, when we enrolled at the junior college. It wasn’t long, though,
before we came to know that we were part of something special. I can only tell you that there was a certain atmosphere and determination not only among the students,
but among the faculty to make this a big success. It was really, a truly, an exciting time. 50 years later, we have
four campuses state wide, I believe we average approximately, maybe 17,000 students enrolled every year, 60,000 plus alumni, so I can say with reasonable certainty,
mission accomplished. This drive for success and excellence which started at the community college provided me and my classmates
with the foundation and confidence that we really could do whatever we set out minds to do. The best evidence of
this is the wide range of backgrounds and disciplines represented tonight by my fellow inductees and Squire Awards recipients. I started thinking, you know,
what does this all mean? Certainly I think we can
all say as award recipients that the recognition is wonderful, but, however, I have to believe
that it’s more than that. It is my hope that as alumni of CCRI our individual and collective stories serve to inspire our students
to believe in themselves, to know that others have
made that journey before them and have shown them that
there are many roads that they can take to
accomplish their dreams. Once again, I thank you for being here. (audience clapping) – Thank you Lou. In 1999, the Alumni Association held it’s first Society
of the Knights event. Since that time there have been eight induction ceremonies and there are now close to 50 members of
this prestigious group. Please help me welcome a number of the Society of the Knights members who are here tonight. It is my pleasure now to introduce to you the 2016 Squire Award winners. When you hear your name is announced, please join us on our stage. Please remember to be on stage until the very end so we can get a nice, big group picture too. Christopher Barber, class of 2008. (audience clapping and cheering) Chris is a registered nurse at the Miriam Hospital in Providence. Eileen Breslin Chaput, class of 1982. (audience clapping) Eileen owns Wickford
Appliance and Lighting with her husband, Tim. Jenny Chan-Remka, class of 1988. (audience clapping) Jenny is the assistant
school superinidendant in Woonsocket Education Department. Angela Creta, class of 1998. (audience clapping) Angela is now director of professional practice innovation magnet at the Miriam Hospital in Providence. Aida Crosson, class of 1989. (audience clapping) Aida is community affairs director for Senator Sheldon Whitehouse. Joanne Daly, class of 1979. (audience clapping) Joanne is first vice president in financial advisor at Morgan
Stanley Wealth Management. David DiSanto, class of 1977. (audience clapping) David is partner and director of business development at
DiSanto Priest & Company. Anthony Goes, class of 2002. (audience clapping) Anthony is an actor, he’s
appeared locally on TV and made his off Broadway
debut in Fly in March. (audience clapping) Rick Norberg, class of 1994. (audience clapping) Rick is president and co founder of Vertika16, formally Atrion SMB. Cynthia Padula. Cynthia Padula, class of 1972. (audience clapping) Cynthia is a professor and director of the nursing master’s degree proram over at Rhode Island College and per diem nurse researcher at the Miriam Hospital. One more time, how about a congratulations and a round of applause for the members of Society of Knights and to our Squire Award recipients. (audience clapping) (soothing music)

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