Third Annual Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service in Policing

Third Annual Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service in Policing


Deputy Director of Community Oriented Policing
Services Rob Chapman: Good afternoon and welcome to today’s ceremony. Please be seated. It is my distinct honor to be onstage today
with the Attorney General, the Principal Deputy Associate Attorney General, as we come together
to congratulate the recipients of the Third Annual Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished
Service in Policing. On behalf of Direct Phil Keith, who could
not be with us today, the COPS Office feels privileged to be a part in administering this
award, and we are proud to celebrate the individuals who embody such remarkable achievements in
criminal investigations, field operations, and innovative community policing strategies. As we begin today’s program, I would ask
that you please stand for the presentation of the colors by the Montgomery County Maryland
Police Department Color Guard and the singing of the national anthem by Dorothy Williams
of the Department of Justice Civil Rights Division. Please join me in thanking the Montgomery
Police Department Color Guard and Ms. Williams for another beautiful rendition of the national
anthem. Please be seated. We are gathered here today to celebrate the
19 honorees of this prestigious award. But before we get started, it’s important
to understand how over 400 nominees were narrowed down to those being honored today. Following the Attorney General’s announcement
of the open nomination hearing, law enforcement agencies, community members and U.S. Attorney’s
Offices from 39 states submitted 199 nominations for 414 line-level deputies, officers and
troopers, representing state, local, tribal, and campus departments, sheriff’s offices,
and other law enforcement agencies. The nominations went through several stages
of review, starting with a panel consisting of representatives from 11 leading law enforcement
stakeholder organizations and groups, followed by a federal review panel consisting of executive-level
reviewers from across the Department of Justice. Recommendations based on those two processes
were then submitted to the Attorney General for selection. It was an extensive process, involving careful
review of literally hundreds of impressive examples of law enforcement at its finest,
doing the work that is all too often not seen on the nightly news, but we know represents
the extraordinary work that takes place each and every day. On behalf of the COPS Office, please join
me in congratulating the recipients of this award. And now it is my pleasure to introduce Principal
Deputy Associate Attorney General Claire McCusker Murray. Before coming to the Department, Ms. Murray
served as a special assistant to the president and associate counsel to the president of
the United States. In that role, she advised the president regarding
civil litigation, regulatory actions, and judicial nominations. Before joining the administration, Ms. Murray
was a litigation and appellate partner with the international law firm of Kirkland and
Ellis, where her practice focused on complex commercial litigation, constitutional litigation,
and internal investigations. She has a remarkable record of public service. In addition to serving as the Associate White
House Counsel, she served as a clerk for two current-day Supreme Court justices, and in
both appellate and line-level prosecutor roles at the Department of justice. Please join me in welcoming Principal Deputy
Associate Attorney General Claire McCusker Murray. Principal Deputy Associate Attorney General
Claire McCusker Murray: Thank you Rob for that kind introduction and thanks to both
you and Director Keith for your leadership at the Office of Community Oriented Policing
Services. Thanks also to Dorothy Williams for gracing
us with her beautiful voice this afternoon. The first duty of government at any level
is to protect the safety of the citizens it serves. Whether you work as a state or local law enforcement
officer, or whether you work here at the Department of Justice, we are all engaged in the critical
work of protecting our communities. On behalf of the Department of Justice, I
want to congratulate our awardees and their families on this wonderful honor. We all owe you a debt of gratitude for the
vital role you play in guarding and strengthening the rule of law. You risk your lives daily to protect us and
our families from violent crime, illicit drugs, and criminal gangs. Thank you for everything you have done to
keep America safe. The Department of Justice understands and
appreciate your work. Speaking of those who understand and appreciate
your work, it is now my honor to introduce the Attorney General of the United States
William Barr. I am not exaggerating when I say you have
no better friend than Attorney General Barr. The Attorney General has devoted much of his
career to public service. During graduate school and law school, he
served in the CIA. Following law school, he clerked for Judge
Malcom Wilke of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C>Circuit. And as a young lawyer, he left private practice
to work in the White House under President Ronald Reagan on the domestic policy staff. Under President George H.W. Bush, he served
as the Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel, the Deputy Attorney
General, and the 77th Attorney General of the United States. While serving the Department during those
years, General Barr helped create programs and strategies to reduce violent crime and
was responsible for establishing new enforcement policies in a number of key areas, including
financial institutions, civil rights, and antitrust merger guidelines. He also led the Department’s response to
the savings and loan crisis, oversaw the investigation of the Pan Am 103 bombing, directed the successful
response to the Talladega Prison uprising and hostage-taking, and coordinated counterterrorism
activities in the First Gulf War. General Barr has also worked extensively in
positions of responsibility in the private sector. He served as the Executive Vice President
and General Counsel for GTE Corporation, Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Verizon,
and was of counsel at the international law firm of Kirkland and Ellis. President Trump nominated General Barr to
serve as the 85th Attorney General of the United States. He was confirmed by the Senate in February
of 2019, making him one of only two people in U.S. history to serve twice as Attorney
General. The other, by the way, was John Crittenden,
Attorney General to presidents Millard Fillmore and William Henry Harrison. Attorney General Crittenden also served as
a U.S. Senator no fewer than four separate times. So Attorney General Barr should have plenty
to occupy him once he retires from the department. Please join me in welcoming Attorney General
William Barr. [Applause] Attorney General William P. Barr:
Thank you very much Claire. Good afternoon everybody and thank you for
coming today. It’s an honor for me to host and participate
in this ceremony. And I’d like to thank Rob Chapman of our
COPS office for organizing this event. And I’d like to thank Regina Lombardo Uttam
Dhillon who head the ATF and DEA and all my colleagues who are US Attorneys who have taken
the time to join us today. And I’d like to thank all of our partner
organizations who’ve helped make these awards possible. And I’d like to recognize each of them:
The Fraternal Order of Police, The International Association of Chiefs of Police, The National
Organization of Black Law Enforcement and Executives, The National Association of Women
Law Enforcement and Executives, The Major City Chiefs Association, The Major County
Sheriffs of America, The National Association of Police Organizations, The Associations
of State Criminal Investigative Agencies, The Hispanic-American Police Command Officers
Association, The National Sheriff’s Association, The National Law Enforcement Memorial and
Museum, The National Association of Counties, The National Association of State Criminal
Investigative Agencies, and The Police Executive Research Forum. Thank you all for participating. I want to pay special tribute to the law enforcement
family members who are here. I want you to know that your sacrifice is
not forgotten and today’s heroes served with distinction in no small part- because of your
love and support. As I said it’s my privilege to be here to
present the Attorney General’s award for distinguished service and policing. To my mind there is no more noble profession
than serving as a law enforcement officer. You put your life and well-being on the line
to protect your communities. And your family spend anxious nights night
after night so the rest of us can sleep in peace. That job has always been a difficult job but
it’s probably been in no time more difficult than today. Not only do we have the problems of the scourge
of drugs in our society in all its manifestations in the problem of violent crime stubborn problem. But, more and more law enforcement is called
on to deal with a lot of the other problems in society that arise because maybe other
people are not doing their jobs and it devolves on law enforcement to be the first line to
deal with some of these problems. Whether be problems of addiction, or problems
of mental illness, this profession these days calls on a special kind of bravery. I remember, a long time ago when the first
Gulf War was fought and the 24th Division rolled out of Fort Stewart, Georgia and there
were people cheering along the highway as they drove off to the port of embarkation. And then of course when the troops returned
in victory there was a ticker tape parade in several cities, including Washington, DC,
and rightly so. But when police officers roll out of their
precincts every morning there are no crowds along the highway cheering them on. And when you go home at the end of the day,
there’s no ticker tape parade. Now one of the reasons is that were fighting
in law enforcement a different kind of conflict. We’re fighting an unrelenting, never ending
fight against criminal predators in our society. Whether battles won and lost each day, there
is never a final resolution. A final victory is never in sight. And yet we, and you, continue to perform your
duty of protecting the community day in and day out. And that takes a very special kind of courage
to wage this kind of fight. A special kind of commitment. A special kind of sacrifice. You know in the Vietnam era, our country learned
a lesson. I remember that our brave troops who served
in that conflict weren’t treated very well, in many cases, when they came home. And sometimes they bore the brunt of people
who were opposed to the war. And the respect and gratitude owed them was
not given. And it took decades for the American people
finally realized that. And I’m very happy today when, I’m at an
airport, and troops come through, coming back or being deployed. Everything stops and they get a round of applause
because people recognize that that’s the right thing to do for these people who are serving
us. But I think today, American people have to
focus on something else, which is the sacrifice and the service that is given by our law enforcement
officers. And, they have to start showing more than
they do — the respect and support that law enforcement deserves. And if communities don’t give that support
and respect, they may find themselves without the police protection they need. It’s an honor for me in a small way, to show
that recognition today. We recognize 19 men and women who have served
their communities with special distinction. And while many of today’s awardees recognize
officers who acted courageously in the face of mortal peril, including quick action to
prevent the murder and neutralize an active shooter. Others are given to recognize exceptional
community outreach, commitment to difficult best occasions, and innovation in law enforcement
technology and tactics. This year also marks the first time that this
award is being given posthumously. Detective William Maldonado is being commended
for his investigation into a shocking murder spree conducted by members of the MS-13 gang
in Suffolk County, New York throughout 2016. By successfully managing intelligence from
numerous sources and coordinating with local police precincts, Detective Maldonado was
able to help his team and the killings and bring the perpetrators to justice and deal
a crippling blow to MS thirteen to influence in Suffolk County. Is if those actions were not heroic enough,
throughout the investigation, Detective Maldonado remained laser focused and dedicated to his
duty, despite an ongoing battle against cancer. Sadly, he lost that fight in 2018but not before
all of the victims’ remains were recovered. And the perpetrators were brought to justice. Please join me in thanking Detective Maldonado’s
family for his selfless sacrifice. Now as we reflect on the contributions of
Detective Maldonado and each of the other individuals we honor today, we should hold
them up as examples of bravery and excellence that continue to inspire our own commitment
to the cause of justice. And also, as reminders of the best qualities
exhibited throughout our law enforcement community. In closing, I want to thank you again for
all that you do. Thank you for keeping us safe where we live
and work. Ever since the first settlers in Massachusetts
to establish the Night Watch 1635, America has had a proud tradition of professionals
who stand guard against those who would do us harm. When you are the latest in that noble line. This administration will always have your
back. And so to all of you, Award winners, family
members and others — Thank you for your exemplary service and God bless you all. PRINCIPAL DEPUTY ASSOCIATE ATTORNEY GENERAL
CLAIRE MURRAY: Thank you Attorney General Barr for your remarks. Now, we will begin the conferring of the medals. We will read the names and provide a summary
about each award recipient and you can refer to your program for more information on each. In the category of Criminal Investigations
for an agency serving more than 250,000 residents, the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished
Service in Policing is posthumously awarded to Detective William Maldonado the Suffolk
County Police Department in New York. To accept the award on behalf of Detective
Maldonado, we’re honored to have with us today members of his family. Joining us are Detective Maldonado’s mother,
Ms. Cynthia Maldonado, his daughters Nicole and Brooklyn, and his significant other, Mrs.
Christine Maldonado. VOICEOVER: Detective William Maldonado was
assigned to assist in the investigation of the disappearance of a young man. Intelligence gathered by detective Maldonado
indicated the missing boy was a murder victim of MS-13. Without the detectives work, along with his
team, the murder spree would no doubt have continued. Instead, several dozen people were arrested
and charged with seventeen murders. The Suffolk County MS-13 Sailor Clique was
eliminated and several other cliques were disrupted. Detective Maldonado accomplished this while
battling cancer and rarely missed work. He succumbed to his illness in 2018, but not
before arrests were made in the cases. PDAAG MURRAY: In the category of Criminal
Investigations for an agency serving between 50,000 and 250,000 Residents, the Attorney
General’s Award for Distinguished Service in Policing is awarded to Detective George
Duarte and Detective Jeffrey Richards of the Providence Police Department in Rhode Island. VOICEOVER: Providence detectives George Duarte
and Jeffrey Richards are being recognized for their extraordinary investigative work
and solving an abduction and sexual assault case of a fourteen year old girl. Their investigation not only solved that case
but also led to solving several other cases of sexual assault by the same suspect. Because of their work, the detectives were
able to have this vicious predator removed from the community, victims of other on reported
crimes were helped, and justice was brought to a number of other victims. PDAAG MURRAY: In the category of Criminal
Investigations for an agency serving fewer than 50,000 residents, the Attorney General’s
Award for Distinguished Service in Policing is awarded to Detective Kenneth Sealy and
Detective Sandra Marquez of the Aventura Police Department in Florida. VOICEOVER: Aventura Detectives Sandra Marquez
and Kenneth Sealy are being recognized for their investigative work in solving several
high dollar fraud schemes. During an intense investigation involving
a large credit card fraud ring operating in South Florida, the detectives identified approximately
$194,000 in fraudulent transactions and seized another $218,000. Another case involved money laundering which
included a loss of almost $4 million over three years. The detectives are continuing this important
work in coordination with several federal agencies. PDAAG MURRAY: In the category of Field Operations
for an agency serving more than 250,000 residents the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished
Service in Policing is awarded to Officer Evan Jurgenson, Officer Nicholas Kelly, Officer
Rachel Mynier, and Officer John Venchak of the Prince William County Police Department
in Virginia. VOICEOVER: In November 2018, the Prince William
County Police Department received a call reporting an active shooter. Within minutes of responding to the scene,
Officer Evans Jurgenson, Officer Nicholas Kelly, Officer Rachel Mynier, and Officer
John Venchak had to take cover from gunfire. Officer Mynier noticed movement on the roof
of a residence and transmitted a warning to incoming units and in doing so saves lives. After the shooter ignored officer’s commands,
he was eventually struck and fell to the ground. Although officers feared a possible second
shooter, they exposed themselves to harm once again to extract the shooter for medical treatment
and also pulled an occupant from the residence to safety. The heroism demonstrated by each officer represents
true courage. PDAAG MURRAY: In the category of Field Operations
for an agency serving between 50,000 and 250,000 residents, the Attorney General’s Award for
Distinguished Service in Policing is awarded to Deputy Richard Hassna of the Alameda County
Sheriff’s Office in California. VOICEOVER: Deputy Richard Hassna is being
recognized for his innovative use of small unmanned aerial systems (UAS) for public safety
operations. In 2018, during the deadly Camp Fire in Butte
County, Deputy Hassna led more than 16 unmanned aerial vehicle teams, and conducted 517 flights
in two days, taking more than 70,000 images. These images were stitched into a map that
allowed residents to see the damage to their property, without being exposed to danger. This was likely the largest response of small
unmanned aerial systems to a disaster scene in U.S. history. Deputy Hassna has also developed tactics and
training for this technology that has redefined high-risk tactical operations and air support
as we know it. PDAAG MURRAY: In the category of Field Operations
for an agency serving between 50,000 and 250,000 residents, the Attorney General’s Award for
Distinguished Service in Policing is awarded to Deputy Ross Jessop of the Missoula County
Sherriff’s Office in Montana. VOICEOVER: Deputy Jessop is being recognized
for his action and dedication to duty in saving the life of a kidnapped baby. In July 2018, the Sheriff’s Office received
a call about a man with a gun, who had fled in a vehicle with his girlfriend’s infant
son. One hour later the suspect appeared back on
the scene without the baby. The suspect said he killed and buried the
baby; but his irrational statements led investigators to search for the missing child. During Deputy Jessop’s search in more than
a million acres of forest, he heard a faint whimper, and found a baby boy lying face down. To his surprise, the baby was alive and uninjured. There is no question Deputy Jessop’s instincts,
perseverance, and dedication saved the child’s life. In the category of field operations for an
agency serving fewer than 50,000 residents the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished
Service in Policing is awarded to Officer Erin Bates and Officer Alexander Stotik from
the Cohasset Police Department in Massachusetts. Cohasset officers Erin Bates and Alexander
Stotik are being recognized for their courageous actions to save the life of a woman who was
being brutally attacked. The officers were dispatched to a home where
neighbors complained of loud noises and a fight. After investigating, the officers heard a
muffled scream, kicked in a locked door and saw what they described as an “attempted
murder in progress.” After heated struggle, the officers were able
to subdue the suspect place him under arrest, and get medical attention for the victim. The officers exhibited extraordinary valor,
bravery, courage, and professionalism in the face of extreme danger that would no doubt
have resulted in the murder of the victim. PDAAG MURRAY: In the category of innovations
in community policing friend agency serving more than 250,000 residents, Attorney General’s
Award for Distinguished Service in Policing is awarded to Officer Phalon of the Las Vegas
Metropolitan Police Department in Nevada. VOICEOVER: In 2017, Officer Phalon McFate
developed “Project Daybreak” an initiative used to address a violent crime hot spot in
a downtown Las Vegas neighborhood. Since it started, Project Daybreak has significantly
contributed to decreasing violent crime by 50% in these neighborhoods. Through positive police interactions, Officer
McFate was able to create transparency and build trust in neighborhoods where these previously
did not exist. The success of Project Daybreak is a direct
result of Officer McFate’s passion and commitment to her community. PDAAG MURRAY: In the category of innovations
in community policing for an agency serving more than 250,000 residents the Attorney General’s
Award for Distinguished Service in Policing is awarded to Officer Jesse Guardiola of the
Tulsa Police Department in Oklahoma. VOICEOVER: Officer Jesse Guardiola’s being
recognized for the Hispanic outreach program he has developed which provides survival Spanish
language training and educates law enforcement and the community on the immigrant Hispanic
culture. The program has received national recognition
and is being promoted as a national model for Hispanic community outreach. Through his efforts, Officer Guardiola is
building bridges and making a difference in Tulsa, Oklahoma. PDAAG MURRAY: In the category of innovations
in community policing friend agency serving between 50,000 and 250,000 residents. The Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished
Service in Policing is awarded to Detective Anthony Roberson of the Providence Police
Department in Providence, Rhode Island. VOICEOVER: Detective Anthony Roberson is being
recognized for his use of community policing initiatives that build partnerships between
law enforcement and local businesses to support underserved families. The shop with a cop program as now served
three hundred children. The handshake initiative has grown from forty
to two hundred mentors and is benefiting families of all backgrounds across the city. Through these programs detective Roberson
is giving back to his community, increasing partnerships, and building bridges between
law enforcement, families, and businesses. PDAAG MURRAY: In the category of innovations
in community policing friend Agencies serving between 50,000 and 250,000 residents. The Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished
Service in Policing is awarded Officer Jonathan Plunkett of the Irving Police Department in
Texas. VOICEOVER: In August 2016, after the murder
of five police officers in Dallas, Officer Jonathan Plunkett began working on an outreach
initiative to bridge the gap between the African American community and law enforcement. The idea was to connect with community in
places where residents would feel comfortable and be open to sharing their concerns and
engaging in dialogue. VOICEOVER: Officer Plunkett knew that barber
shops would work. The initiative which began with one shop has
now increased to sixteen shops, and is known as “Shoptalk.” Through Shoptalk, Officer Plunkett has created
a way to build mutual trust and respect between law enforcement and community members who
had not been reach with traditional police outreach efforts. PDAAG MURRAY: In the category of innovations
in community policing friend agency serving fewer than 50,000 residents. Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished
Service in Policing is awarded to Detective Kathleen Lucero of the Isleta Tribal Police
Department in New Mexico. VOICEOVER: Isleta Tribal Police Department
detective Kathleen Lucero is being recognized for community policing initiatives that provides
resources to impoverished youth and build connections between law enforcement and the
community. For the annual “Reaching for a Star” initiative,
Detective Lucero provides gifts and food to more than 150 children and their families
during the holiday season. And through her “Camp Courage” program,
sixty children participate in a youth camp every summer. Detective Lucero’s on, and off-duty dedication
cannot be overstated, and has made a true impact on the community. PDAAG MURRAY: In the category of innovations
in community policing for an agency serving fewer than 50,000 residents, Attorney General’s
Award for Distinguished Service in Policing is awarded to officer Troy Quick of the Conyers
Police Department in Georgia. VOICEOVER: Officer Troy Quick is making a
lasting impact on the youth within his community. As a school resource officer at Rockdale County
High School, Officer Quick has been able to help a number of students leave gang life. Whether it is through the mentoring sessions
he coordinates for students, donating items to families in need, or just taking an interest
in student’s daily lives, Officer Quick is a true example of dedication and service. PDAAG MURRAY: Please join me in thanking Attorney
General Barr for his participation here today. And thanks to all of you for attending today’s
ceremony. It’s been a wonderful event, and once again
I congratulate all of our honorees. Let’s give each of the award recipients another
round of applause. I now ask that the award recipients, their
families, and the heads of the law enforcement agencies come to the front of the room for
the draping of the metals.

24 thoughts on “Third Annual Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service in Policing

  1. Proud to be a citizen of this great country! Thank you for acknowledging these fine men and women~ & thank you for sharing it with the public.

  2. So you would say education is a must AG Barr to be able to do the work on training is a must practice is a must to not just show up for a paycheck,

  3. It's funny because past sessions I was noy able to communicate with the department of Justice and today all a sudden I can write a reply, yet some do it just to think they are above the law because of the badge, to be a law enforcement employee it's who you know not what you know, now that the year is coming to an end all officers are good ng to be giving tickets just to make quotas, dont get me wrong I give my all to those protecting our country we just need to do better fight for a reason not just because of color Creed race sex etc, America means something till we all know what that is equality will be exist

  4. I can't believe it a crime 18 years still in progress/a crime of this caliber- victims rights denial and you are being rewarded

  5. This is outrageous, from Barr at 16:12 American people “have to start showing, more than they do, the respect and support that law enforcement deserves. *And if communities don't give that support and respect they might find themselves without the police protection they need*.”

  6. Do not ask for nor expect any more respect than a common thief or armed robber as long as you police for profit.

  7. I am definitely respectful of the officers. But the justice system they support needs to be ripped apart.

    But go ahead, get rid of the police and I'll use the tax dollars I save to fund a local militia.

  8. Absolutely disgusting comments from Barr. This is fascism in plain sight. An attack on the core of our democracy. Our nation is in peril.

  9. I FEEL MR.ATTY GENERAL THAT YOUR COMMENTS FROM YOUR PREVIOUS SPEECHES GAVE ME HOPE THAT THE RULE OF LAW WOULD BE RE-ESTABLISH IN THIS GREAT COUNTRY OURS I'M 5TH GEN TEXAN AND WE HAVE ALL SERVED OUR COUNTRY GOING BACK TO 1863 BUT THE LEAKS COMING OUT I HOPE ARE NOT TRUE BUT SEN GRASSLEY WHO HAS SERVED IN THE HALLS OF CONGRESS FOR MANY YEARS GAVE A PROPHETIC STATEMENT HE SAID I'M AFRAID THIS IS TAKING TO LONG AND THATS A BAD OMEN FOR THIS INVESTIGATION I SADLY BELIEVE HE WAS RIGHT AND IT ONLY ENBOLDENS THE PERPETRATORS OF THIS COUP. THE AMERICAN PEOPLE ARE NOT FOOLED AND THE BALLOT BOX WILL BE OUR RECOURSE WE NOW HAVE BECOME IN POLITICS LIKE A BANANA REPUBLIC AND IT HAS ALREADY STARTED YOU HAVE A STATE DISTRICT JUDGE WHO ISSUED AN ORDER TO STOP BUILDING THE WALL WHERE ITS MOST NEEDED IN LAREDO TX RIGHT ACROSS FROM NUEVO LAREDO TX WHERE THE CARTELS ARE NOW IN CHARGE AND I'M NOT A LAWYER BUT LAST TIME I CHECKED FEDERAL SUPREME COURT DECISIONS CAN SUPERCEDE ANY STATE DISTRICT COURT DISCISION

  10. Did Barr really just say:

    If communities don't start to give police the respect and support he feels they deserve these communities may find themselves without Police protection?

    What the fuck :O like holy shit

    Communities may find themselves without Police protection this is crazy

  11. I like all Americans wanted these COUP plotters brought to Justice but I have news for every the FBI under Wray has already put enough pressure and maybe even threats that Horowitz will give a sanitized version of his report that will exculpate the FBI and CIA of any wrongdoing this will serve to strengthen the resolve of these bad actors to continue their nefarious ways and I blame Obame for politicizing the law enforcement entities of the Federal government

  12. Law enforcers, Law makers, and those that support either are no different than those our founding fathers fought the war of independence against. Biden is corrupt, and Obama used the law enforcers to spy on Trump. There will be no justice because justice is based upon a 2 tier system. Does it strike anybody that 2 of our presidents and hundreds of our nations elitist have flown on a plane name lolitta express? The French created a justice system in 1790 called the Guillotine for situations just like we have today in the USA.

  13. Not three days later a squad of cops LARPing as soldierboys kill a hostage and a bystander while using occupied vehicles as cover, all to protect some God damned jewelery. This aged real fuckin' well, didn't it?

  14. He could of meant a few things in his, "police won't protect you" comment. One of them is, people could start quitting the force leaving less cops to protect

  15. Is this just a circle jerk for cops? It's like the equivalent of the Oscars for actors to make themselves feel more important than they are?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *