What Men Need to Know About Prostate & Testicular Cancer

What Men Need to Know About Prostate & Testicular Cancer


Since 2003, the focus for the month of November
has been – men’s health. The goal of the “Mo-vember” initiative is “to change the face
of men’s health.” That’s why many men choose to grow facial hair as a visible sign of support.
The beards often become “conversation starters” and get men talking.
I’m a Mo-Bro this month…. Texas State Senator Kirk Watson isn’t giving up on personal
hygiene, he’s sporting the stubble to bring awareness to cancers some men may be reluctant
to talk about.  I’m a testicular cancer survivor… I’m
supposed to be dead a couple of times over. Doctors diagnosed Watson at age 32. After
years of remission, a routine cat-scan found another tumor
So I think it’s important for us to educate young boys and men about men’s health in
a way that’ll make a difference for them. Not always do they know what they ought to
be looking for, how to do self-exams. As a Urologist, Dr. Lucas Jacomides understands
that talking about cancer may be uncomfortable, but since one in six men will be diagnosed
with prostate cancer in their lifetime, it’s a conversation worth starting.
It still kills over 30-thousand men a year in this country. 9:28 If you live long enough
and nothing else claims you, this likely will. Prostate cancer occurs mainly in older men.
Early on, there may be no specific warning signs or symptoms, so a prostate screening,
or a PSA blood test provides your best chance of early identification.
As prostate cancer progresses, warning signs may include: weak or frequent urination, the
inability to urinate, pain or burning, blood in the urine or semen. Some men may experience
nagging pain in their back, hips, or pelvis and have difficulty getting an erection.Dr.
Jacomides says the complications from successful prostate cancer treatment can be managed.
Testicular cancer is largely a younger man’s disease. It’s warning signs include: a lump
in either testicle and a feeling of heaviness in the scrotum a dull ache or pain in the
abdomen, groin, or testicle, a sudden collection of fluid in the scrotum, and back pain. It’s
an unfair cancer because it hits men in their 20s who have every reason to feel invincible.
We feel great. We’re at the peak of our virility, and then suddenly, you feel a mass.
That type of feeling should get your undivided attention. Get seen! Because testicular cancer
can double in size – double in size – within 2 weeks to up to 8 weeks.
There’s no reason not to check yourself out, be aware, then go to the doctor and ask
questions.

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