Where Did It Go? – Oakville & Milton Humane Society

Where Did It Go? – Oakville & Milton Humane Society


Donors are always wondering where their donations went and how charities use them so we decided here at CanadaHelps to
find out. Join me today as I visit a charity and find out how they use your donation. Someone gave me The Oakville Humane Society, I think, today, but I don’t
– dog toys? – see it anywhere. Where did it go? Oh, DEX! It’s always something with that dog! All right, let’s go off to Oakville
– oh! I’ll need this – and see “Where Did It Go?” Hey, it’s Owen with CanadaHelps and today we are in Oakville, Ontario to see
the Oakville & Milton Humane Society. Let’s go see “Where Did It Go?”! It was started 75 years ago and originally, the cause was workhorses. Because back then, the workhorses were being used in
Oakville, as they were everywhere, and they weren’t well cared for, and that’s kind of how it all started. And it’s moved on to taking care of dogs and cats; advocating
for animals in areas of cruelty, abuse and neglect; housing animals. So we kind of deal with everything. We deal with homeless, forgotten,
neglected and abused animals. And, we’re happy to do that everyday. My day-to-day job is obviously ensuring animal welfare is out in the community. Assuring that the owners are providing
the standards of care as per the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act. Our mandate has expanded. Originally we were Oakville, and then we were Oakville and the surrounding area,
and then it became Oakville and Milton because more families were moving to the area. A lot of it is multicultural too. There’s a lot of first-generation families moving into the area, and they may come from
a culture where animals are cared for in a different way. So a lot of what we do now is education. We have a real strong focus on education. That’s one way donations help us, is that it
goes into our outreach and education area. And what that does is it works with children. We work with children in the schools, and we also have a summer camp. We have an after
school program as well for kids. So we are reaching that next generation when they are younger. We also do outreach for adults as well, so we’re out there in the community
giving information on proper pet care, what the by-laws are for the area … … because in different areas there’s a different number of animals you can have, different
things you can and cannot do. So education is a big part of it. We’ve also dealt with people who had great intentions, but maybe have never had a
puppy or a kitten before, and didn’t realize what went along with it. We’ve had people bring those pets to us too, and we’re always happy when they do because that’s
an animal we can help. We can work with it, we’ll find it a new home. We’re a low euthanasia shelter, which means that everything you see here that’s in
our adoption facility, is going to stay with us until it finds a home. One of the things that we do that is kind of unique to our shelter – not every shelter is able to
do this, and the only reason we can is because of the donations – is we will foster orphaned kittens. We will take in kittens as young as a day old, we’ve had them come
in with their umbilical cords still attached – that’s how young they are. We will actually foster them. We have foster families and staff members who will take them on, and that means feeding them every 2 hours,
24 hours a day. It is very expensive to do that, and that’s why a lot of shelters aren’t able to do it. They would love to do it, but they can’t. For $250 what we can do is we can
provide the milk replacement, which is expensive, the vaccines when they get old enough for vaccines… … microchipping, worming, all of the things we have to do with a kitten to get it ready for
adoption. Those first 10 – 12 weeks is going to cost us $250 for every kitten. Those kittens grow up to be fabulous pets so we know, when we see them go to a new homes, it is
so heartwarming. Because you know that without the donation and without the donors, we wouldn’t have been able to do that. And that’s a kitten we would have to say “no” to.
But because
people donated through CanadaHelps, we were able to do that. Probably out of all the facilities around, we are one of lower vehicle ratio
per officer, so all of that does cost the shelter money. We are not government funded, nor do we receive any funding for any other animal welfare associations, so any little amount
of money we get from our public helps us in the end to provide the help to those animals. We are first and foremost a grassroots charity. When people donate to us, they
can come in anytime and see exactly how their money is helping us. When you walk around, you see that we may not have the biggest, fanciest, shiniest shelter, but
what we do have are staff and volunteers who care so much about the animals. The main thing is, again, having us out on the road, providing to help us
out on the road, is ultimately being the voice for those animals. Thanks for joining me to find out “Where Did It Go?” I hope you watch the next episode where we
visit another great charity and find out how your donations help. Also, visit www.canadahelps.org and make your donation today.

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